Injury Affected Athletes in Kampala

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Andrew Kpehe

Two Liberian representatives at the 42nd edition of the World Cross Country Championships in Kampala, Uganda, Lucy Massaquoi and Andrew Kpehe, could not live up to expectation.

Lucy, 18, crossed the finish-line at 93rd place in the 5K junior race on Sunday with a time of 27:41. She competed along with over 400 athletes from 59 countries.

Andrew finished 96th in the 8K junior races with a disjointed arm, and finished at 30:14.

“He fell on his arm climbing the hill,” said head Coach Samuel Cooper, who also blamed the hot and humid conditions.

“Kampala is very hot and the hills on the course make the race chaotic,” Cooper said.

The World Cross Country Championships was held at Kololo Independence Grounds in Kampala, Uganda on Sunday March 26.

The race, which had a field of 108 runners, was won by 19 year old Letesenbet Gidey of Ethiopia, who was the defending champion, in a time of 18.34.

Kenya dominated the 42nd edition.

Athlete Lucy Massaquoi

Graced by the first citizen of Uganda, Yoweri Kaguta Museveni, the races were run on a great course with risings and depressions under relatively warm and humid conditions, and watched by a great and passionate crowd.

Kenya won the mixed relay, as well as the senior individual and team women plus men events to amass 10 medals in total (3 gold, 4 silvers and 3 bronzes).

Ethiopia took gold in the team event for junior men and Uganda clinched gold in junior men (individual).

104 and 106 athletes took part in the Women and Men U-20 events respectively.

Kenya won the mixed relay. Kenya’s mixed relay team consisted of Asbel Kiprop (5:19), Wilfred Nzisa Mbithe (6:07), Bernard Kipkorir Koros (5:22) and Beatrice Chepkoech (5:58).

17 year old Ugandan Jacob Kiplimo claimed Uganda’s first ever gold medal in World Cross Country history.

Kiplimo said shortly after the medal presentation ceremony that he anticipated his victory.

“Yes, yes, yes. I always thought I could win. It was a very good race. When I decided to break away going into the first lap, I knew I was going to win,” he said.

Ethiopia’s Amdework Walelegn, who finished second in the junior race, cast blame on the Ugandan crowd.

“I am happy but not satisfied with second. The crowd made it very difficult for me to run according to my plan,” he said.

Meanwhile, Richard Yator Kimunyan, who took third in the junior men’s race, castigated the challenging course.

“The course was difficult although I could have done better but I miscalculated towards the end,” he noted.

Ethiopia took gold in the women junior (individual event), as well as the junior men and women team events.

Geofrey Kipsang Kamworor of Kenya had the last laugh when he outpaced Uganda’s Joshua Cheptegai with one lap to go.

Cheptegai finished a distant 30th but it was good enough to help team Uganda scoop bronze.

Uganda’s President Museveni and the first lady, Janet Museveni, who also doubles as the country’s Minister of Education and Sports, graced the Sunday afternoon event.

Other dignitaries included the IAAF president Sebatisan Coe and his African based vice president Hamad Kalkaba and Minister of Presidency in charge of Kampala Betty Namisango Kamya were some of the other high profile personalities in Kololo.

A total of 557 athletes took part in the 2017 IAAF championship.

Prize Money

A lump sum of $310,000 (sh1.1bn) was offered for the top performers. A total of $140,000 (sh498m) went to the top individual race winners in the two races.

In the team events of both senior races, another $140,000 was also on offer. Here $20,000 (sh71m) was up for grabs for each of the winning team.

There was also $30,000 for the inaugural relay race.

The winning team (Kenya) grabbed $12,000 (sh42.7m). The prize money for the mixed relay applied to the top four teams.

The mass race of non-professional athletes crowned the evening.

       Final Standings:

  • Kenya – 95 Points
  • Ethiopia – 76 Points
  • Uganda – 32 Points
  • Eritrea – 15 Points
  • Bahrain – 13 Points
  • United States – 11 Points
  • Morocco – 8 Points
  • Tanzania – 8 Points
  • Japan – 7 Points
  • Turkey – 6 Points
  • Spain – 3 points
  • Burundi – 2 Points
  • South Africa – 2 Points
  • Peru – 1 Point

     Medal Table:

  • Kenya – 10 Total (3 Gold, 4 Silver, 3 Bronze)
  • Ethiopia – 8 Total (4 Gold, 4 Silver, 0 Bronze)
  • Uganda – 3 Total (1 Gold, 2 Bronze)
  • Bahrain – 1 Total (1 Bronze)
  • Eritrea – 1 Total (1 Bronze)
  • Turkey – 1 Total (1 Bronze)Two Liberian representatives at the 42nd edition of the World Cross Country Championships in Kampala, Uganda, Lucy Massaquoi and Andrew Kpehe, could not live up to expectation.

    Lucy, 18, crossed the finish-line at 93rd place in the 5K junior race on Sunday with a time of 27:41. She competed along with over 400 athletes from 59 countries.

    Andrew finished 96th in the 8K junior races with a disjointed arm, and finished at 30:14.

    “He fell on his arm climbing the hill,” said head Coach Samuel Cooper, who also blamed the hot and humid conditions.

    “Kampala is very hot and the hills on the course make the race chaotic,” Cooper said.

    The World Cross Country Championships was held at Kololo Independence Grounds in Kampala, Uganda on Sunday March 26.

    The race, which had a field of 108 runners, was won by 19 year old Letesenbet Gidey of Ethiopia, who was the defending champion, in a time of 18.34.

    Kenya dominated the 42nd edition.

    Graced by the first citizen of Uganda, Yoweri Kaguta Museveni, the races were run on a great course with risings and depressions under relatively warm and humid conditions, and watched by a great and passionate crowd.

    Kenya won the mixed relay, as well as the senior individual and team women plus men events to amass 10 medals in total (3 gold, 4 silvers and 3 bronzes).

    Ethiopia took gold in the team event for junior men and Uganda clinched gold in junior men (individual).

    104 and 106 athletes took part in the Women and Men U-20 events respectively.

    Kenya won the mixed relay. Kenya’s mixed relay team consisted of Asbel Kiprop (5:19), Wilfred Nzisa Mbithe (6:07), Bernard Kipkorir Koros (5:22) and Beatrice Chepkoech (5:58).

    17 year old Ugandan Jacob Kiplimo claimed Uganda’s first ever gold medal in World Cross Country history.

    Kiplimo said shortly after the medal presentation ceremony that he anticipated his victory.

    “Yes, yes, yes. I always thought I could win. It was a very good race. When I decided to break away going into the first lap, I knew I was going to win,” he said.

    Ethiopia’s Amdework Walelegn, who finished second in the junior race, cast blame on the Ugandan crowd.

    “I am happy but not satisfied with second. The crowd made it very difficult for me to run according to my plan,” he said.

    Meanwhile, Richard Yator Kimunyan, who took third in the junior men’s race, castigated the challenging course.

    “The course was difficult although I could have done better but I miscalculated towards the end,” he noted.

    Ethiopia took gold in the women junior (individual event), as well as the junior men and women team events.

    Geofrey Kipsang Kamworor of Kenya had the last laugh when he outpaced Uganda’s Joshua Cheptegai with one lap to go.

    Cheptegai finished a distant 30th but it was good enough to help team Uganda scoop bronze.

    Uganda’s President Museveni and the first lady, Janet Museveni, who also doubles as the country’s Minister of Education and Sports, graced the Sunday afternoon event.

    Other dignitaries included the IAAF president Sebatisan Coe and his African based vice president Hamad Kalkaba and Minister of Presidency in charge of Kampala Betty Namisango Kamya were some of the other high profile personalities in Kololo.

    A total of 557 athletes took part in the 2017 IAAF championship.

    Prize Money

    A lump sum of $310,000 (sh1.1bn) was offered for the top performers. A total of $140,000 (sh498m) went to the top individual race winners in the two races.

    In the team events of both senior races, another $140,000 was also on offer. Here $20,000 (sh71m) was up for grabs for each of the winning team.

    There was also $30,000 for the inaugural relay race.

    The winning team (Kenya) grabbed $12,000 (sh42.7m). The prize money for the mixed relay applied to the top four teams.

    The mass race of non-professional athletes crowned the evening.

           Final Standings:

  • Kenya – 95 Points
  • Ethiopia – 76 Points
  • Uganda – 32 Points
  • Eritrea – 15 Points
  • Bahrain – 13 Points
  • United States – 11 Points
  • Morocco – 8 Points
  • Tanzania – 8 Points
  • Japan – 7 Points
  • Turkey – 6 Points
  • Spain – 3 points
  • Burundi – 2 Points
  • South Africa – 2 Points
  • Peru – 1 Point
  •      Medal Table:

  • Kenya – 10 Total (3 Gold, 4 Silver, 3 Bronze)
  • Ethiopia – 8 Total (4 Gold, 4 Silver, 0 Bronze)
  • Uganda – 3 Total (1 Gold, 2 Bronze)
  • Bahrain – 1 Total (1 Bronze)
  • Eritrea – 1 Total (1 Bronze)
  • Turkey – 1 Total (1 Bronze)

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