What Chances for Female U20 Lone Star in Nigeria?

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Skipper Kebbeh Lamin .jpg

It is unfair when you are scheduled to take an examination and you are not well prepared for it by either your parents or your teachers.

Then during the examination you realized you did not perform well. Then you moved on to the final examination, after resting for several days, and still you received no help from either your teachers or your parents. But those who could not help you in any way expect you to do well.

That is the scenario with the U-20 female national soccer team, before their 7-1 loss to their Nigerian counterparts, and secondly towards their second leg preparations to their second leg encounter this Sunday in Nigeria.

Having suffered such a humiliating defeat in the first leg, you would have thought that the team immediately went to camp to prepare for the return-leg away in Nigeria. “After the loss the players were sent home,” said a source close to the team.

And training did not resume till last Saturday, in which all the players were not in attendance.

How do we now expect the team to prepare well to defend the nation in Nigeria? Head coach Christopher Wreh and his assistant Oliver Makor now get to know that they have more problems on their hands than previously. The Liberian people will judge their competence after such poor results, they should be aware now.

Before the first leg, they would claim they did not know much about their opponents, which is fair enough. Now after the first leg and now know the challenges before them, what can they offer?

There is a famous saying by retired coach Josiah Johnson that football is like biscuit in which it breaks unexpected but even that those who are conditioned with better focus are able to break theirs on where it is expected or closer to it.

Head coach Wreh and his deputy Makor have not spoken to the media since the first leg defeat, the inadequate preparation for the first leg and now the second leg would bring them more disappointment.

As former players they need no one to tell them about how adequate preparation makes the difference in developing a team for a competition. It is also equally true that no matter how well a team is prepared another team is a little ahead of it.

In any tournament, there is actually one winner and a runner-up but at least the rest of the competitors must play as expected to demand some respect. Hence the same yardstick must be used on the current discussion.

If we want our teams to play well and win; if we are not happy when our teams are defeated both at home and away, then of course we must get to work and do what we need to do to prepare our teams for continental competitions.

Otherwise, we are embarrassing ourselves and making our players more uncomfortable in the end in playing in competitions that we are honestly not determined to win.

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