Rev. Menjor’s Urgent Plea: Stop Witchcraft, Promote Tolerance

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The Pentecostal prelate, Reverend Joseph Menjor, has urgently appealed to the nation for an end to witchcraft and for the encouragement of tolerance in the country.

In a recent exclusive interview with our Senior Reporter, Edwin Fayia, Rev. Menjor decried the prevalence of witchcraft in Liberia, manifested particularly in secret killings, especially in this pre-election season, and the persistent discouragement of educational initiatives in many rural and semi-rural parts of Liberia.

He called on all Liberian churches to unite to fight witchcraft. Churches, he stressed, should also encourage politicians and the government to stop political bickering and promote tolerance in the country.

Let us first deal with witchcraft. This is a very serious and dangerous phenomenon that has from time immemorial stifled the development of a strong, enlightened, united and prosperous nation. How many Liberians know that right here in Montserrado County there are villages and towns in which NO schools and no churches are tolerated—why? Because these will “interfere” with their witchcraft activities. We know of one village not far from Monrovia, where the chief zoe has vowed that hair will grow in his palms before any school is ever built in that village! The village is dominated by witchcraft (devil business), liquor and drugs. Anyone who dares attempt to bring development and progress to that village is driven out with spiritual wickedness thrown at him or her.

Rev. Menjor knows this. He also knows that the entire nation is dominated by witchcraft, zoe bushes and other demonic activities. Education and religion, especially Christianity, are discouraged in these places. Remember what happened in Malawu, Lofa County, two years ago? The town’s zoes chained two Christian pastors who had traveled two days to make peace with them. And that was after the zoes had put the country devil outside and confiscated the cross from the church! Then Internal Affairs Minister at the time, Morris Dukuly, capitulated to the zoes and advised the pastors to leave the town, effectively trampling upon their constitutional freedom of worship.

But think about what is happening in the rest of the country, where ritualistic killings abound and are set to intensify, especially during this electoral season.

We find it most unfortunate that the Episcopal Diocese of Liberia, at its biennial convention in New Kru Town last week, did not deal effectively with evangelism. And what did the Methodists and other mainline churches—like the Baptist, African Methodist, African Methodist Zion and Presbyterian churches say about evangelism during their last conventions?

We call on these and all other churches to make EVANGELISM a national priority in their outreach. If they do not, Liberia will revert to heathenism and the whole nation will be covered with demonic activities that will seriously obstruct our march to educational advancement, a wholesome value system and modernity.

In the interview, Rev. Menjor dealt also with the issue of the continuous political bickering within the government and between the government and the Liberian people. Look at what is happening between the Liberian Senate and the Finance Minister. With all the work Minister Konneh has to do in this time of economic crisis, the Senate can find nothing else to do but to pursue him in the Supreme Court? Our Legislative Correspondent Burgess Carter reported Wednesday that the entire Liberian Senate skipped session on Tuesday in order to proceed to the Supreme Court to pursue one man

—Minister Konneh. How reprehensible (shameful, unacceptable)!
Are they telling us that because they have the power of “contempt” they will close down the superior body in the whole national Legislature?

That in itself is a contemptible act. Why? Because all the Senate has done is to allow itself to be held in contempt by the Liberian people. What do we mean? We mean what contempt means—disdain, disapproval, scorn. The Liberian people expect far more of their elected officials than that. Because they work for us—the people who put them there—the Senators should conduct themselves with forbearance (patience, restraint, moderation, mercy), temperance (soberness) and humility (unpretentiousness, humbleness, unassuming nature).

If God Almighty used His almighty power against us human beings for every little offense we committed, what would happen to the human race?

What tolerance did Justice Minister Benedict Sannoh exercise last week when he threatened the media with “prosecution”? In so doing, he pretended that the government had no faults or problems of its own—and he knows that is far from the truth. Were it not, would the government be so unpopular?

Remember, Mr. Minister, that you, the Senate, the entire Legislature, all branches of government and ALL public officials are servants of the people. The sooner you all behave like that the sooner will peace, harmony, unity and nationalism will be created amongst us.

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