Terrorism, Piracy, Globalization and Profit Motives

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An introspective yet fervent teaser, and we’re going to put it in context because poor suffering Liberians could be caught literally in the crossfires. For although terrorism as we know it today was owned by Jihadists after the irrelevance of Arafat’s PLO, ironically it came to prominence in the Middle East through the violence in Palestine of Jewish state proponents (like Menanchin Begin, head of the militant group, Irgun) against British authorities in charge there. Partly, the outcome of that outlawed group’s effectiveness was the 1948 Balfour Declaration which gave birth to Israel. This provoked war from Arab states that ended temporarily with the 1949 Armistice Agreements, and the resultant partition of the disputed land into Israel, the Gaza Strip, and the West Bank.

Anyway, now it’s an open secret that initial funding for terrorists of the Arafat variety came from oil rich Middle Eastern countries and their wealthy individual donors, many of whom were either sympathetic to the political causes, or paying protection money to prevent sabotage of extensive lucrative business interests. And, of course, some terror organizations became self-supporting as they turn to banditry, such as seizing banks, oil fields, and receiving ransoms for kidnapped victims. But this doesn’t explain why the phenomenon of terrorism widens dangerously. Whereas sea piracy, which was disruptive to maritime commerce and costing shipping insurers exponentially, came to a halt after concerted no nonsense pressure was applied to protect international trade essential to Globalization.

This is where the editorial hits pay-debt; the profit motive of terrorism, aptly referred to as “a whole value chain”. Incidentally, after his glorious services to mankind’s freedom, President Eisenhower cautioned about the symbiosis of the military industrial complex. A warning, as it would turn out, with implications for old and new major powers. Obviously, the zillions spent worldwide on security and the military can’t be justified without the fear terror induces. So piracy which takes wealth away from the 1 percent filthy rich of the world got smothered in the cradle, while terrorism with ability to grow it was nursed to adulthood. By the way, African historians who know how strangers smelled gold, brought their god and guns, destroyed empires, emptied communities off their strong – carted, hogtied, baptized, and shipped them like chattels to slavery – aren’t amazed at the morbid meanness for making money.

The central question though, is, do these young terrorists know they’re the expendables? Perhaps, someone should tell them no waiting virgins exit beyond the skies. It’s a void peopled and transformed into paradise by the imaginations, assumptions, and aspirations of proud delusional man so besotted by blind faith believes that of all animals he is the only one who thinks, and hence immortal. Tellingly, we shouldn’t look further for the source of René Descartes’ “I think, therefore I am [God]” quote. If we may, god of what: the other animals like us?
To cut long matters short, lol, after all that loquaciousness – let’s keep terrorists out through joint MRU coordinated operations. On a final note, the last musings shouldn’t be viewed as denying God’s existence (I stay away from Nietzsche); rather it must be judged as an expression of frustration at the puerile worldview of these mindless killers.

About the Author
Sylvester Moses was the director of the National Security Agency (NSA) during the Doe Administration. A graduate of Fourah Bay University in Sierra Leone, Mr. Moses was recruited to join the Sierra Leone national security apparatus. He was trained at Scotland Yard in England, United Kingdom. It was he, whose maltreatment by Justice Minister Chea Cheapoo had led Head of State Samuel Doe to summarily dismiss Justice Minister Cheapoo in August, 1981. Mr. Cheapoo was at the time of the most powerful members of the Doe Administration. Mr. Moses is a self-employed resident of the United States.

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