Who Duped Charles Sirleaf of US$866K, LD$10,480M?

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Former Deputy Governor of the Central Bank of Liberia, Charles Sirleaf (right)

GT-Bank employees claim his wife authorized the withdrawals, which Mrs. Sirleaf denies

Several controversial issues have been raised in the investigative report of the Liberia National Police (LNP) submitted on Tuesday, September 8, to the Monrovia City Court, regarding the unauthorized withdrawal of US$886,580 and L$10,480,000 from a joint checking account titled, ‘Bojelene Gust House Incorporated’ operated by Mr. Charles E. Sirleaf and his wife, Fanta Donzo Sirleaf at the Guaranty Trust Bank (GT-Bank).

Two of the bank’s employees, Andrea Doubah, a female and account officer of the bank, assigned to the Sirleaf’s account, and Genesis David, the head of operations, were both forwarded to the court on the alleged commission of the crime of theft of property, forgery and “Consummation of crime and criminal conspiracy.”

Both defendants David and Doubah were later released after their lawyers filed an unspecified amount of bail to the court.

The contentious issue came about during the investigation of defendants David and Doubah, both accusing the wife of Mr. Charles Sirleaf of being the one behind the withdrawal of the money from the bank, a claim Mrs. Sirleaf has so far denied, according to the police report.

In his written statement, David explained that he is clothed with the responsibility to supervise tellers at the Sinkor Branch and admitted that he approved of all the slips that were used as source documents to allow withdrawals from Charles Sirleaf’s accounts at the bank.

In his verbal statement, the document quoted defendant David that Mrs. Sirleaf visited the bank on March 4, 2019 and was ushered into the office of one of the bank’s executives before he, Genesis, approved the withdrawal slip for the payment of US$100,000 to Andrea Doubah from one of Mr. Charles E. Sirleaf’s accounts and the cash was turned over to her in his (David’s) presence.

David further claimed that Mrs. Sirleaf visited the bank on October 29, 2019 and submitted a counter to the bank thru Andrea Doubah for payment of US$88,000 out of the Bojelene account.

The record also claims that Doubah told the investigation she was the account officer to Mr. Charles Sirleaf’s account as well as the Bojelene Guest House Incorporated account.

Doubah further claimed that Mrs. Sirleaf was one of the persons to whom she, Doubah, turned over the cash and that the cash was withdrawn from Mr. Charles Sirleaf’s account based upon the instruction from Mrs. Sirleaf.

In her statement, the record claimed that Mrs. Sirleaf and her husband are signatories to the Bojelene Guest House Incorporated account maintained at the GT-Bank.

Mrs. Sirleaf claimed that in 2017, she opened a Liberian Dollar account and a United States Dollar account at the GT-Bank, but when the government decided to freeze her husband’s accounts in reference to the alleged missing LD$16 billion, Andrea Doubah called her and advised that she must withdraw her cash and take it home so that the government does not seize their monies.

Mrs. Sirleaf further explained that she informed defendant Doubah that due to the huge amount in her account, it was risky to keep the cash home and suggested that her US Dollar account be debited and the cash be deposited into an account to be opened by her in the name of her brother at GT-Bank Liberia limited.

She said she filled in a withdrawal slip authorizing US$90,000 from her account and she later deposited the money into an account bearing her brother’s name (Boimah Konah) bearing the account number 20331895722590.

She further narrated that in July 2019, she instructed her brother to withdraw the amount of US$40,000 from this account and the withdrawal slip was delivered to Andrea Doubah who executed the withdrawal and that she received the monies through defendant David, and the US$50,000 remained in her account bearing her brother’s name. 

She further claimed that she and her brother did not transact any business within their respective accounts until May 26, 2020, when they withdrew all of their monies, both Liberian and United States Dollars.

In reference to the Bojelene Guest House Account, she said, she was only a signatory and on October 31, 2019, she and her husband  Charles Sirleaf wrote a GT-Bank check bearing serial number 300319539 authorizing US$88,000 withdrawal from that account.

She also claimed that the check was given to Andrea Doubah at their residence in Congo Town, but defendant Doubah did not present the check to the bank, neither did they receive the cash from defendant Doubah.

She further narrated that the counter check for the US$88,000 was not signed by them (she and her husband), the signature F. Donzo affixed on the check was not written by her.

She said that she and her husband only visited the bank’s head office one time and that was on November 2, 2019, to discuss with the management the forgery of the counter check and other withdrawal slips used to withdraw monies from both their US and Liberia Dollar accounts.

She said, an allegation that defendants Doubah and David received monies from the bank through them on three occasions on behalf of her husband is false and misleading.

She said the allegation that she received US$100,000 on March 4, 2020, is also untrue.

Author

  • Anthony Kokoi is a young Liberian sports writer who has an ever-growing passion for the development of the game of football (soccer) and other sports. For the past few years, he has been passionately engaged in reporting the developments of the game in the country. He is an associate member of the Sports Writers Association of Liberia (SWAL). He is a promoter of young talents. He also writes match reports and makes an analysis of Liberian Football.

6 COMMENTS

  1. What is wrong with duping a duper??? Absolutely nothing!!! This ass should be behind bars By now for conspiring with the then CBL Board and sucking a whole 2. 8 Billion Liberian dollars from our poor economy.

  2. My goodness! Corruption in Liberia can be found:
    In the streets,
    In the Judiciary,
    In the legislature,
    In the garbage bags,
    In the classrooms across the country,
    At the Ministries (the institutions of the government),
    At grocery stores,
    At private and public schools,
    In taxi cabs, the motor bikes and buses…. forget not the Keke,
    At churches,
    At general markets also at the Red Light,
    At hospitals, clinics,
    At restaurants,
    At the airports,
    In the “homes” and “bedrooms” of some women & men,
    In the kitchens
    In the ranks of white and blue collar people,
    In rural and urban areas, cities, towns and villages,
    The banks and loan institutions,
    In the grass, on the bridges, motels and brothels,
    The military, police force and
    Just about everywhere in Liberia, there’s Cor— rup—- tion!

    In order for us to rid ourselves of cor-rup-tion in Liberia, maybe a three-day fast is needed.

  3. Mr. Hney,

    Stop please. LMAO. you cannot find corruption in the garbage bags. I dont even think you can find corruption in the kitchen, well, maybe you can convince me of that.

    But garbage bag? Thats a first.

    Good morning, Sir.

  4. Comrade Kimba,
    By His grace, before the day is over, I will give a story to read (probably without tears this time) or a video to be watched.

    Oh yes, corruption in Liberia can be found in the kitchens and garbage bags.
    First, the kitchens. Please note that I define corruption variously. So in this particular case, I define corruption as an abomination and a crime.

    Kitchen corruption….
    In this department (if I may call it as such) is where some women do juju in order to control their men. Or sometimes, some people harm their fellow human beings by poisoning them in the food they offer. As I am told, some wicked women put the dust or powder of their juju in the food. In my humble opinion, any woman who has done something as horrendous as that has committed a sin. A sin is an abomination, pure and simple! More importantly, that should count as a form of corruption.

    Now the garbage bag corruption….(The corruption that intrigues you).

    In this particular department, all “Kanna” dirt (you name it) gets to be put in the bags. My example is human dirt or human waste. Goodness gracious…..human waste goes in the commode, not in garbage containers. On the other hand, EPA rules require paper bags to be used for garbage disposal. But in the Paynesville area, I saw something unlike a paper garbage bag that a garbage contractor used. The gentleman that I am referring to charged ten bucks! He circumvented the EPA regulations. I understand that the fellow was an employee. He deserves no blame. In any case, that kind of manuvering, is a kind of corruption my friend.

    Kimba, I hope you will agree wholeheartedly that corruption exists everywhere in the world. But, it is written….”charity starts at home”. In other words, before we venture out of our country in order to talk about corruption, let’s talk about some of the issues that drag or hold us back in Liberia. Honestly, corruption in Liberia has been a problem! From the get-go, the settlers were very, very corrupt.

    Hang in there Kimba. Strive to be a mover and a shaker. Eat good food. Exercise yourself gentleman. Make Liberia strong. Fight corruption. Be cool. Abstain from weak and dis-organized political figures like the neophytes we all know.

    Peace

  5. There is an exception in your list, Hney. The military, for now, has proven to be resilient to any form of corruption. If not, King Weah would have had a free ride to do anything. He’s sometimes hampered or made to rethink his decision because of the military.

    I wish it could have been the case with the judiciary branch, things could have been picking up progressively by now. We should rethink the judiciary system such that it can be independent from the executive branch of government; it means finding ways and means to make them financially independent, where promotion should be based on merits and hard work and such promotion should be defined by internal mechanisms not dictated by any outside source but only the judiciary branch of government. If we succeed in doing this, everything will fall in place in Liberia.

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