Voters Transported from Montserrado to Margibi

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In lower Margibi County, at least 13 candidates, including incumbent Senator Clarice Jah, of the Unity Party; Saah Gbollie, former Margibi County representative and National Patriotic Party in the 52nd legislature; and UL Prof, Dean Ansu Sonii, are all vying for the single senatorial post. Prof. Sonii is running as an independent candidate, while Jah and Gbollie are seen as the front runners for the County senatorial seat.

 

At the Rock Church School, polling got off to a very slow start. Voters from the surrounding communities, including Dwazon, Gbengba town, and Camp Edward Beyan Kesselly Military Barracks, trickled in to cast their ballot.

 

Few hours later, what appeared to be chartered vehicles, began bringing voters in. A driver from one of the buses told the Daily Observer that he had taken some of the voters from Soul Clinic Community in Paynesville City,  Montserrado County. The driver's admission validates complaints made earlier this year in some quarters that people were being trucked in from other parts of the country to register and increase the voting population of certain particular candidates.  This was widespread in the 2011 General and Presidential Elections, which President Ellen Johnson won for her second and final term.

 

Our reporter further observed that some of the voters, who were brought in to cast their ballots, were drinking a white creamy substance. One of them told the Daily Observer: “We have to get in zico (a Liberian slang among young people, meaning ‘high’ or ‘tipsy’) before we can go and cast our vote.” However, the election officers did not allow them in until they had left their bottles behind.

 

Further up the highway, in Margibi, is a very small community school at Marshall Junction, which another polling center comprising five rooms.

 

The election officers, even though had no police officers to help them properly order the process like as was the case at Rock,  which had at least four police officers,  still managed to keep the place orderly.  Voters were seen observing the ‘2-3 feet apart’ preventive method put in place by the NEC against the further spread of the deadly Ebola virus disease, which has so far killed more than, 3000 persons in Liberia.

 

It was the same slow turnout, one of the polling officers who didn't want to be named told the Observer.

 

Off the highway and deep into Lower Margibi County, in Folley Town, the issue of health measures was thrown out of the window. 

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