‘Tax Court Ruled Based on Procedural Error, Not Case Merit’ – Lonestar

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The Management of Lonestar Cell MTN says it takes exception to the ruling handed in the US$19.2 million case involving Lonestar Cell MTN and the Liberia Revenue Authority (LRA).
The Judge of the Tax court, Mozart Chesson, ruled in the case on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 at the Temple of Justice, against Lonestar on procedural error and not the merit of the case, a release from the corporation said. The Board of Tax Appeals had earlier ruled in a decision that Lonestar was obligated to the government for $ 1.8 million plus penalties and not the U$ 19.2 million, the government is claiming. Both Lonestar and the GOL took exception to the initial ruling of the BOTA in 2014.
“Lonestar Cell MTN holds strongly that the case was also unfairly adjudicated at the Tax court and therefore deserves an appeal hearing by the Supreme Court. Besides the procedural inadequacies, the pieces of evidence adduced in court by the LRA during the hearing did not merit the ruling as handed by the court,” the company said in a statement released yesterday afternoon.
“The Judge’s Decision leaves Legal Scholars pondering especially when the substantive issue in a case is being set aside and ruling made on “procedure error” which was not addressed. Others are asking why an institution once certificated by the government of Liberia as the largest tax payer is being signaled out in a manner that could send mixed messages to financial institutions,” said the statement, signed by Zenu K. Miller, Corporate Communications Officer.
Lonestar Cell MTN boasts that its financial dealings remain impeccable and replete with values such as complete accountability and integrity.
Meanwhile, Lonestar Cell MTN sees as premature the pronounced victory celebration and media campaign launched by the Liberia Revenue Authority (LRA) in the wake of an appeal filed at the Supreme Court of Liberia.

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