Special Session of Legislature Deferred?

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According to reports from inside sources, President Weah (middle) has delayed the reconvening of the Extraordinary Session on Tuesday, moving it by two weeks to raise the “needed resources.” (Far left: House Speaker Bhofal Chambers; far right: Senate Pro Tempore Albert T. Chie)

-President Weah yet to issue October 9’s Proclamation to Certificate the Extension

(Pictures of Speaker Bhofal Chambers, President George M. Weah and Senate President Pro Tempore Albert Chie)

The Daily Observer has gathered that President George Weah is yet to issue a Proclamation to Certificate Extension of the  54th Legislature from Tuesday, October 9, to Friday, November 9, 2018, and deferred the Extraordinary Session.

According to reports from inside sources, the President has delayed the reconvening of the Extraordinary Session on Tuesday, moving it by two weeks to raise the “needed resources.”

Other sources said the deferral of the Special Session would be intended to subsequently reject the reconvening of the Legislature and overrule further inquiry into the alleged “missing L$16 billion.”

Additional sources said the Legislature will reconvene in its Second Extraordinary Session on a date the President will propose, and the Session will be a “slideshow or showbiz” in order to aid the Executive to justify and support its claim that there is “No L$16 billion missing.”

However, others believe that the top agenda for the reconvening of the Second Extraordinary Session should be the ratification of the US$2.5 billion swap deal between the Government of Liberia and the China Roads and Bridge Corporation.

It has been further gathered that members of the House of Representatives and the Senate are expected to meet today (Monday) in meetings to disregard the already signed “Joint Resolution of the Extension of Certificate,” in order to cooperate and endorse the new proposed date of the President —Tuesday, October 23, to Friday, November 23, 2018.

This is in accordance with Article 32 (b) of the Constitution of the Republic of Liberia which says: “The President shall, on his own initiative or upon receipt of a certificate signed by at least one-fourth of the total membership of each House, and by proclamation, extend a Regular Session of the Legislature beyond the date of adjournment or call a Special or Extraordinary Session of that Body to discuss or act upon matters of national emergency and concern. When the extension or call is at the request of the Legislature, the proclamation shall be issued not later than forty-eight hours after receipt of the certificate by the President.”

The Resolution also acknowledged that there are several unresolved key matters of national interest that require the urgent attention of the 54th Legislature and is aware of the emergency nature of these matters, including the alleged missing L$16 billion, which are all geared toward the enhancement of the socioeconomic interests of the state and its people.

Meanwhile, the 1st Session of the 54th Legislature started on the second working Monday, January 15, and ended on Friday, August 31, 2018. In order to discuss and act upon matters of national concern, the Legislature extended its annual constituency break from Saturday, September 1, to Saturday, September 15, 2018.

The House of Representatives has acted upon or approved (ratified) 15 laws (bills) during its 1st Session of the 54th Legislature containing 57 regular day sittings and six Special Sittings, respectively.

Author

  • Anthony Kokoi is a young Liberian sports writer who has an ever-growing passion for the development of the game of football (soccer) and other sports. For the past few years, he has been passionately engaged in reporting the developments of the game in the country. He is an associate member of the Sports Writers Association of Liberia (SWAL). He is a promoter of young talents. He also writes match reports and makes an analysis of Liberian Football.

1 COMMENT

  1. The members of the Legislature should only be paid per diem per day, which is mostly for things like food and commute to and from sessions. And that should be based on the cost of one’s daily meal and transport. They’re already paid a regular salary, as exempt employees.They’re not hourly workers.

    But, they do have the opportunity to get more money during that session.

    In the U.S., when they are in session the extra they get is called per diem.Senators get $86 a day, while Representatives get $77.
    Why is Liberia hoping to pay US$10,000?

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