Senate Passes Pre-financing Road Pavement Agreement

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The Liberian Senate has unanimously voted to pass into law the pre-financing agreement for the pavement of 24.5km of existing secondary roads from Klay to DC Clarke in Bomi County and 51km of selected neighborhood/community roads in Monrovia and its environs.

The decision by the Senate was based on a report submitted by its Committee on Foreign Affairs and Public Works with the mandate to act on a bill submitted to the Legislature by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf for enactment in June.

In the financing agreement, the East International Group Incorporated, which won the National Competitive Bidding, agreed to procure on behalf of the Liberian government “for the purpose of implementing the project, an external loan in an amount not to (exceed) US$59,567,019.09 on the terms and conditions set forth or referred to in the agreement.”

According to the agreement, the repayment of the financing amount disbursed in the amount of US$19,905,537.39 for the 24.5km Klay to DC Clarke road pavement “shall commence and be paid in seven equal amounts, over a period of seven calendar years, which shall begin within twelve calendar months of the first disbursement of the financing, based upon the project milestone disbursements received by the contractors.”

Similarly, the same aforementioned repayment conditions apply for the financing disbursement of US$39,661,473.51 for the pavement of 51km of selected neighborhood/community roads in Monrovia and its environs.

In their report, the committees noted that “this agreement is in line with the development agenda of Liberia; and as concluded in the hearing, stakeholders maintained that if the agreement is passed into law, the road pavement project will enhance development, improve livelihood, healthcare, education, commercial activities, alleviates poverty and so forth.

“In view of the conformity of the proposed agreement between the Government of Liberia and East International Group Inc to the overall developmental agenda of the country to improve existing road networks in various communities and give access to health, educational, economic and other crucial facilities, and in respect of the collaboration between the company and Qingjian International in Liberia Development Company Ltd (CNQC) to provide additional financial and technical support to the company to successfully implement the project, the Joint Committee hereby recommends to the plenary of the Liberian Senate to approve the ratification of the proposed Pre-financing Agreement, as attached.”

8 COMMENTS

  1. Why are the roads measured in kilometers? I thought the should be measured in miles? Has Liberia changed from the English system of measurement to in international standard of measurement?

    It’s confusing trying to convert from kilometers to miles.

    • J D; thanks! Very good question. Very many Liberians are accustomed to distances measured in miles, in Liberia. It’s should be mandatory, that our roads distances be written in both MILES and KILOMETERS; for the benefits of all. Even if we change from the English System of measurement to Metric. As a matter of fact, I see nothing wrong with keeping the English System in Liberia. In many cases, both systems are used together. Looking
      at the speed o meter on most new cars, you will see Miles per Hour and also Kilometers per Hour. Let’s make it simple. Write all measurements in both Metric and English systems; when dealing with the public. There are simple conversion charts. Stop the CONFUSIONS…

  2. That’s one of our problems. We do not value our uniqueness. We changed our school system to confirm to the subregion, changed from secretaries to ministers, now have 210 current instead of 110, now we’re talking kilometers instead of miles when our textbooks are American, etc. The list is endless.

    When I went to Liberia, I blew my iPad when I plugged it in the wall; it was 210 current.

  3. That’s one of our problems. We do not value our uniqueness. We changed our school system to conform to the subregion, changed from secretaries to ministers, now have 210 current instead of 110, now we’re talking kilometers instead of miles when our textbooks are American, etc. The list is endless.

    When I went to Liberia, I blew my iPad when I plugged it in the wall; it was 210 current.

  4. It sounds good to say they are paving or resurfacing 80 kilometers of road for 49 plus million dollars. It’s actually 49.71 miles of road for 49million dollars; 1million dollars per mile. Got the picture? It’s calculated and intentional.

    • P.E; thanks! We’ve got to learn both systems of measurement. I think it’s dumb to change our electrical voltage from 110/220v, 60cycles; to straight 220v. 50 cycles. I wonder, what happened to all our old electrical devices; built on American standard? In the old days, it was a lot easier to use an adapter. Now, there are possibilities of fire hazards in some cases. People ought to be careful.

  5. Kakata highway all the way to Ganta, you see km. On Robertsfield highway, you see 50/mph. Of course we have L$ and US$. We have meter in Sanniquellie schools and inch in Fish Town schools! We have liter in Voinjama and gallon in Barclaysville. We want to be American; we want to be African. We were once citizens of the United States of America!

    Anyway, please Senators, include the Pipeline Road in that budget…all the way from red light to the end of the stretch. Driving on that road is like driving on the moon. it is horrifying!

  6. The price gone up to $1mil per Kilometer… If I understand correctly the GOL is on the hook for the $59mil over 7 years.

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