Rep. Yekeh Kolubah’s Suspension Lifted  

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Rep. Yekeh Kolubah at Temple of Justice, surrounded by supporters.

— As Supporters Storm Supreme Court Yard

Associate Justice Joseph Nagbe has mandated the leadership of the House of Representatives to lift the suspension of Rep. Yekeh Kolubah.

Rep. Kolubah, who represents the people of Montserrado County District#10 was suspended for insulting the presidency a few weeks ago by the majority of his colleagues.

Delivering his mandate, Justice Nagbe told the leadership of the house that the suspension of Rep. Kolubah was done outside of the law including their own rules. As a result of this violation, Justice in Chambers Nagbe requested the House to lift the suspension and return to the status quo.

However, Rep. Kolubah argued that the process leading to his suspension was bogus and did not follow due process. Justice Nagbe decision came immediately after listening to both the arguments by lawyers representing the House of Representatives and Rep.Kolubah reserved his decision as to whether or not to place a stay order on the House of Representatives.

The Plenary, the highest decision-making body of the House of Representatives on recently took a decision to suspend Rep. Yekeh Kolubah of Montserrado County Electoral District #10 for 30 Sitting Days (equivalent to almost four months) without py for what it termed as Rep. Kolubah’s constant habit of raining insults at President George Weah.

It was the decision Rep.Kolubah rejected and subsequently filed a petition for prohibition (stay order) before Justice Nagbe, claiming that the plenary action was in violation of the Constitution and the rules and procedures governing the legislature, which he sought the court intervention to halt to allege practice.

The House chairman on Judiciary, Hon. A. Kanie Wesso said that as per the order, the ban on Rep. Kolubah will be lifted and that issues about due process will be fellow.

“As per the order, we accept the order to lift the ban on Rep. Kolubah and take of the law and proceed according without rules,” Cllr. Wesso said.

According to House’s own rule, 48.4, the suspension is only permitted after the investigation is done by the committee on Rules, Order, and Administration, and reports are submitted to plenary for action.

In reaction to the court ruling, Rep. Kolubah lauded the Court for their farsightedness to uphold the rules of law, “We will what happen but I believe in the court that why, I come to it, and this is the second time.”

Meanwhile, Rep. Kolubah and his supporters stormed the premises of the Supreme Court, to the dismay of people who have gone there to seek justice and court workers, where they held placards displaying the alleged illegal activities of the House of Representatives against their lawmakers.

Some of those supporters were heard saying praises to the lawmaker, describing his suspension as politically motivated, and, they would stand up for the lawmakers. Though the holding up of placard and political slogan and campaign are forbidden at the Temple of Justice, Rep.Kolubah and his supporters ignored the rules, and could not listen to the court officers advised not to turn the court facilities into a political ground.

In Kolubah’s case, he has complained that his colleagues rendered the final decision of suspension against him now petitioner without the guide on due process as provided for in their own rules and procedures.

“The respondent compliant against the petitioner was never submitted to the Committee on Rules and Order as they unanimously agreed to deal with their own matter, most surprisingly, the Committee on Rules and Order did not submit report and recommendation to be examined by the House for final decision’,” Kolubah’s lawsuit argued.

Rule 48.1 of the House of Representatives says”The House shall take disciplinary measure against any members who violate or fail to comply with the Houses Ethics and Procedure specified in the rule.” Further 48.2 provides that “where any member is aware of the existence of a breach of the code of conduct and procedures he or she may request the House to take the necessary disciplinary measure against who is alleged to have committed the breach.

However, rule 48.4 states that” the speaker shall refer the matter to the Committee on Rules and Order, the House after examining the report and recommendation submitted shall render its decision, and that decision is final.”

On the issue of what constitutes the 30-days suspension, Kolubah argued that Rule 2 provides that “Daily Session of the House of Representatives shall be held on Tuesday and Thursday of each week from the hours of 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at which time roll call and votes are taken, while Monday and Wednesday are set aside for Committee meeting and Friday to be observed for constituency business and this rule applies that there are sixteen meetings or sessions in a month.”

Rep Kolubah, in his petition argued that there has been no Investigation done by the Houses’ Committee on Rules and Order to authenticate the truthfulness of  the allegations as  punishment imposed against the petitioner is unconsitutional, vague and ambiguous.

In his petition for a Writ of Prohibition filed on his behalf by Counsellors Lavala Superwood and Jimmy Saah Bombo before Associate Justice Joseph Nagbe, Chamber Justice of the Supreme Court against Speaker Bhofal Chambers and members of the House of Representatives (respondent) to place a stay order on the enforcement of the suspension.

13 COMMENTS

    • Except Yekeh Kolubah and his supporters do not mind a short term euphoria, they have nothing to jubilate about.

      And Supuwood and Bimbo are aware of that reality.

      But of course, (with their bank accounts now already inflated), its none of their business to go any further than what they have been solicited to do, even upon realizing the obvious that neither their client nor his supporters have any true understanding viz Justice in Chambers Nagbe requesting the House to ”lift the suspension and return to the status quo” IS NO ACTUAL LIFTING OF SUSPENSION.

      For following the Justice’s determination, the speaker forthwith referred the matter to the Committee on Rules and Order which the latter has made clear that its decision to suspend the representative Yekeh Kolubah cannot be altered. THAT IS THE REALITY!

      In other words, with the House examining the report next week upon recommendation for the bad conduct Yekeh Kolubah’s three months suspension without pay, that decision shall now become final as concluded by the Supreme Court’s decision hereunder…

      ”The speaker shall refer the matter to the Committee on Rules and Order, the House after examining the report and recommendation submitted shall render its decision, and that decision is final.”

  1. Suspension lifted or not, Rep. Yekeh Kolubah must comport himself as a honorable member of the Legislature. This ruling from the branch of government with authority to interpret the constitution shouldn’t be seen as a license for more irresponsible antics, including threats.

  2. Representative Kolubah’s is only exercising his rights as a citizen. He speaks the truth as he sees it. To say that” the president is corrupt” should not be interpreted as an offense. Kolubah challenged the president to show his bank account when he served as Senator and to shop his bank account after he became president to the present. This has not happen. It it therefore un-constitutional for the House to “punish” Representative Kolubah for saying that the “President is corrupt.” What has the House got to do with the Presidency? Is it not to serve as “Check and Balance?” This is just what the Honorable Member, Yekeh Kolubah is doing “checking” on the president to determine whether or not he is clean. Continue the good work Representative Kolubah. Work for the people of Liberia and fear nothing but to do wrong. The people and the law is on your side.

    • Old man momo:
      How ignorant and misinformed you tend to be as to the truth of Yeke Kulabah’s incivility as a law maker.
      You cannot insult a president as a “dog” anywhere around the world, and your stupid self talking about freedom of speech. You people are the curse on Liberia, that little impoverished village with nothing to show for more than 170 years!
      Sierra Leone, Ivory Coast, which have had wars, have emerged out of their rattles while Liberia remains a cursed poor village with no developments, its citizens remaining beggars in their own country with Lebanese, Indians, now Fulanis, abusing their daugters helplessly!
      You are a damned stupid fool and illiterate to think Yeke Kulabah is doing the right thing?
      Which country have you seen that happening if not in cursed Liberia and Liberians!!

      • Mr. Whyteme say whatever you may. Respect is earned. It is not conferred. Weah since day one when he became President of Liberia, he started stealing. He is yet to for the 16 billion Liberian dollars that disappeared at the Freeport of Monrovia. The driver who drove the container truck load of money from the Freeport of Monrovia to Weah’a house, is yet to be found. Then again, 25 million u.s. dollars of the people’s money was again unaccounted for and went missing under Weah’s watch. In this midst of these happenings, Weah built 45 mansions in Monrovia. Where did he get the money from?
        To command people’s respect, you have to be honest with people’s money. Liberia’s money is not Weah’s personal money. The National Treasury of Liberia belongs to the people. If Weah wants to be respected, he has to be honest to his people as other African presidents do. To command the respect of Representative Kolubah and other patriotic Liberians, president Weah must show himself to be honest, patriotic, hardworking, and allow for the national wealth of the country to trickle down to the common man so that the suffering which you mention that Liberians are experiencing to the extend” that Liberians are beggars in their own country with Lebanese, Indians, now Fulanis, abusing their daughters helplessly,” can be minimize or curtailed. Always remember, Respect is Earned. It is not Conferred. The President must earn his respect. To do this he must be not only development oriented, but also he must be accountable to the people he represents and not steal from the National Coffers as is the present state of affairs in Liberia that is causing our people to suffer under the Weah’s administration.

  3. Fourth sentence typographical error. Should read as follows: Kolubah challenged the president to show his bank account when he served as Senator before becoming president and to show his bank account after he became president to the present.

    Last sentence should read as follows: “the people and law are on your side.”

  4. How many CDC Representatives were suspended from the House of Representative when they used to rain insults on Ellen Sirleaf..why was it ok to insult Ellen Sirleaf but not George Weah?

  5. Old Man Momo,
    When you say that “Respect is earned and not conferred”, you’re certainly right to a certain point. But it is not always true to say that “respect” is earned. Although it is not a tangible item, “respect” is certainly conferred sometimes without the rest of us knowing why that’s the case.

    Let’s consider a few examples:
    (1). The former German tyrant, Adolf Hitler, was brutal! Hitler brutalized the blacks of Germany (who were referred to as the “Rhineland Bastards”) during his leadership. Furthermore, Hitler caused the deaths of millions of Jews, gypsies, gays and hundreds of thousands of blue-eye countrymen and women. Sadly, the concept of “respect” was forceably conferred on Hitler. In fact, a good number of Hitler’s SS troops confessed after his tyranny that they fought because they were forced to fight. Example, Helmut Schmidt, a former Chancellor of West Germany made such a confession. Schmidt was a world war two fighter! Realistically, the total respect Hitler garnered was not earned. And,

    (2). Let’s face it. The North Korean strongman, Kim, is not really liked in his country. The North Koreans live in an existential tyranny. In the simplest of terms, the concept of “respect” as we know it, is conferred on Kim because of fear. Kim’s respect that he gets is not earned.

    Mr. Old Man Momo, you said a lot of things about Weah. My point is not to defend Weah when he is wrong. I don’t play find defense. Every human being commits errors. On the whole, I think Weah’s critics “stretch the truth” to falsehood sometimes, if not most of the time.

    Weah may have built some houses. A house is not necessarily a mansion. I live in a state where a lot of mansions exist. Most of the mansions I see contain many, many
    rooms, swimming pools, and in some cases, up to date fences or gates.

    Do Weah’s houses have the amenities of a mansion? Lastly, did you or a friend of yours count Weah’s houses or “mansions” up to 45? Is the number “45 mansions” an exaggeration?

    In your comment above, you stated unequivocally that an unnamed driver drove a truck full of money to Weah’s house, but unfortunately, from that time up to date, the driver has never been seen or heard from. From all indications Sir Momo, you seem to know “something about that driver” than a majority of us. So, please permit me to ask the following questions:

    1. What’s the gender of the driver who drove a truck full of money to Weah’s house? And,

    2. What’s the name of that driver who stole or drove the loot to Weah’s residence? It might be easier to track the driver if and when his partial identity is revealed. What do you think?

    In your post, you also said this, “he has to be honest to his people as other African presidents do”. The “he” is a direct referral to Weah. So let me ask this question…..

    With all due respect, can you name at least ten “honest” African presidents….. past and present? Are you serious? Do you really, really want Weah to be like the ten honest presidents that you know?

    Lastly, Whyteme makes the case that our Liberian girls are being misused by foreigners. In your response to Whyteme, you seem to suggest that the Liberian girls’ hard time is caused by Weah. Comrade Momo, isn’t that a typical example of an exaggeration? In reality, the Lebanese and others have been in the business of “misusing” our Liberian girls/women before you were born. How can the hardship of the Liberian women be blamed on the incompetence of Weah’s leadership?

    Mr. Momo, I am not taking you to task. I just found it difficult to absorb some of the things you wrote.
    Thanks for taking your precious time to read my comment.

    Peace.

  6. Old Man Momo,
    When you say that “Respect is earned and not conferred”, you’re certainly right to a certain point. But it is not always true to say that “respect” is earned. Although it is not a tangible item, “respect” is certainly conferred sometimes without the rest of us knowing why that’s the case.

    Let’s consider a few examples:
    (1). The former German tyrant, Adolf Hitler, was brutal! Hitler brutalized the blacks of Germany (who were referred to as the “Rhineland Bastards”) during his leadership. Furthermore, Hitler caused the deaths of millions of Jews, gypsies, gays and hundreds of thousands of his blue-eye countrymen and women. Sadly, the concept of “respect” was forceably conferred on Hitler. In fact, a good number of Hitler’s SS troops confessed after his tyranny that they fought because they were forced to fight. Example, Helmut Schmidt, a former Chancellor of West Germany made such a confession. Schmidt was a world war two fighter! Realistically, the total respect Hitler garnered was not earned. And,

    (2). Let’s face it. The North Korean strongman, Kim, is not really liked in his country. The North Koreans live in an existential tyranny. In the simplest of terms, the concept of “respect” as we know it, is conferred on Kim because of fear. Kim’s respect that he gets is not earned.

    Mr. Old Man Momo, you said a lot of things about Weah. My point is not to defend Weah when he is wrong. I don’t play dumb defense. Every human being commits errors. On the whole, I think Weah’s critics “stretch the truth” sometimes, if not most of the time.

    Weah may have built some houses. A house is not necessarily a mansion. I live in a state where a lot of mansions exist. Most of the mansions I see contain many, many
    rooms, swimming pools, and in some cases, up to date fences or gates.

    Do Weah’s houses have the amenities of a mansion? Lastly, did you or a friend count Weah’s houses or “mansions” up to 45? Is the number “45 mansions” an exaggeration?

    In your comment above, you stated unequivocally that an unnamed driver drove a truck full of money to Weah’s house, but unfortunately, from that time up to date, the driver has never been seen or heard from. From all indications Sir Momo, you seem to know “something about that driver” than a majority of us. So, please permit me to ask the following questions:

    1. What’s the gender of the driver who drove a truck full of money to Weah’s house? And,

    2. What’s the name of that specific driver who stole or drove the loot to Weah’s residence? It might be easier to track the driver if and when his partial identity is revealed. What do you think?

    In your post, you also said this, “he has to be honest to his people as other African presidents do”. The “he” is a reference to Weah. So let me ask this question…..

    With all due respect, can you name at least ten “honest” African presidents….. past and present?
    Do you really, really want Weah to be like some African presidents?

    Lastly, Whyteme makes the case that our Liberian girls are being misused by foreigners. In your response to Whyteme, you seem to suggest that the Liberian girls’ hard time is caused by Weah. Comrade Momo, isn’t that a typical example of an exaggeration? In reality, the Lebanese and others have been in the business of “misusing” our Liberian girls/women before you were born. How can the hardship of the Liberian women be blamed on the incompetence of Weah’s leadership?

    Mr. Momo, I am not taking you to task. I just found it difficult to absorb some of the things you wrote.
    Thanks for taking your precious time to read my comment.

    Peace.

  7. The tyrant called Adolf Hitler was FEARED, but not respected. The North Korean rocket man is FEARED by his people and regional countries, but not respected.
    Most African tyrants are / were feared, not respected.

    Fear is NOT EQUAL to respect

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