‘Quincy B Responsible for His Own Death’

Police release accident findings, charges manager Lewiz McCarthy

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The traffic section of the Liberia National Police has concluded its investigation to establish the cause and circumstances that led to fallen music icon Quincy B’s death.  According to the LNP, Quincy B, (Quincy Luwokollie Burrowes) died as a result of excessive speeding and reckless driving, which violated section 10.10 of the vehicle and traffic laws of Liberia.

The LNP investigation report added that section 10.10 of the vehicle and traffic laws of Liberia called for drivers to drive at a speed limit of 35 miles per hour in residential zones, such as the Tubman Boulevard area.

“When a driver is driving at 35 miles per hour and then an accident occurs, injury will be minor,” the report explained.  “But when the driver is speeding and an accident happens, injury will be serious just like the case of Quincy, which resulted in his death and one person sustaining a broken leg.

“In addition, Quincy B’s 2007 Toyota Camry summersaulted into the air up to 52 feet, which is another clear indication that he was driving above the speed limit stipulated in the law,” the report revealed.

The investigation report said that immediately the artist entered the curve, he lost control of his car apparently as he tried to dodge a vehicle that was coming in from the fence of the UNMIL in order to avoid a head-on collision. This vehicle was on its rightful lane, and bears no responsibility for the artist’s death.

The report added that testimonies gathered from the other survivors revealed that Quincy B was driving at the same time playing with his phone.

“Driving at the same time playing with gadget or any other material violates section 10.2 of the vehicle and traffic law, which means he did not care about observing traffic rule.  In a nutshell, Quincy B is responsible for his own death and the injury his friend received,” the reported noted.

Meanwhile, the investigation report fell short of disclosing whether Quincy B had a valid driver’s license and whether he had on his seatbelt the night of the accident.  However, a traffic police officer who spoke on the condition of anonymity said if Quincy had on seatbelt it was going to protect him when the car summersaulted.

“He never had seatbelt on; that is why, when the vehicle crashed it was difficult for him to remain safe and secure within the car. Even if the car has airbags, it could not work because airbags are meant to work with seatbelts, not replace them,” the police officer said.

Meanwhile, the Liberia National Police has charged Lewiz McCarthy, manager of the late Quincy B, for civil liability and violation of the insurance law of Liberia.

McCarthy, who was released by his lawyer, will be responsible for injury expenses for artist CIC, who was also involved in the accident, because the car was not insured, according to the LNP charges.

According to a source, the late Quincy B’s family, Lewiz McCarthy and others were all invited on Friday at the LNP Headquarters in Monrovia.

Under Chapter 5 of the Vehicle and Traffic Law of Liberia, which is captioned, Civil Liability, every owner of a vehicle used or operated on any highway to which this title is applicable shall be liable and responsible for deaths or injuries to a person or property(ies) resulting from negligence in the use or operation of such vehicle.

The late singer did not have a driver’s license and the vehicle was registered in McCarthy’s name. The police say this is in violation of police motor vehicle regulations.

According to our source, McCarthy is being processed to court.

The late music icon, Quincy B was born on April 24, 1996, and died on March 3, 2017 in a tragic motor accident on his way from an impromptu performance at Anglers Bar and Restaurant in Monrovia.

Entering the mainstream music industry at the age of 19, with the single “Dream,” Quincy B released more than 10 singles before his death, with 15 unreleased songs which are expected soon.

Before his death, he became the youngest artist in Liberia’s struggling music history to become a brand ambassador for a major telecommunications company, Lonestar Cell MTN.

6 COMMENTS

  1. “The investigation report said that immediately the artist entered the curve, he lost control of his car apparently as he tried to dodge a vehicle that was coming in from the fence of the UNMIL in order to avoid a head-on collision. This vehicle was on its rightful lane, and bears no responsibility for the artist’s death”

    I have a serious reservation with the statement above coming from the Liberian National police. How can the vehicle come from the UNMIL fence and be on the right lane and Quincy tried to dodge it and lost control? I believe the vehicle from the fence cold have stopped and looked to make sure that no car was coming, because he came from the fence into the roadway thereby leaving no time for Quincy to dodge him/her the

  2. I do believe that if Q.B was driving safely, with all measures taken into consideration that we are warned not to drive recklessly, using your seat belt, and not under the influence of alcohol then, we could be talking a different story not a death story i believe .

  3. This should be a warning shout to all vehicles drivers and the LNP officers that are assigned at various traffic intersections or streets to make sure that drivers are always on a limited speed and are always making use of their seat belt.

  4. THE LIBERIA NATIONAL POLICE HAVE TO WORK HARDER IN TENCE OF CHECKING EVERY CAR’S AND IT SPEED.I BELIEVE IF THIS INSPECTION ARE TAKING INTO PRACTICE POLICE WILL STOP MANY CARS AT NIGHT. THE NEXT ON THE AGENDA IS CONCERNING THE CONTAINERS TRUCKS THAT MOVE AT DAY TIME, IS NOT SAFE FOR THE CITIZENS. HOW MANY HUMAN SHOULD LOST THEIR LIVES BEFORE THE GOVERNMENT STOP TRUCKS FROM MOVING AT DAY TIME?

    • I think the problem of container trucks being involved in accidents or causing them is not about when these trucks are operated, but the safe operation of these trucks. The authorities need to ensure that trucks using the motor ways are operating under safe conditions. Operators of these trucks are very reckless when it comes to safety;that is why so many accidents are occurring, resulting in the loss of lives and property. I think operating them only at night when there is less movement of people and other vehicles might also help to reduce the risk of accidents.

  5. Comment: Life Is All About Death. That Was His Own Time To Leave Us. Even If He Was Driving 35 Miter Per Hour As Indicated By The Liberian Police Traffic Law Section 10, If That Was His Time To Leave Us, No Matter What He Must Have Leave Us. We Just Hope And Pray That Someone To Replace Him Because, He Is Gone For Good.

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