Senators Recline Into Executive Session

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Senators attending the 57th day sitting of the Senate plenary Tuesday failed to carry on open deliberations due to the 'lack of agenda items'.

The only item on the agenda, a communication from Gbarpolu County Senator Armah Zulu Jallah, could not be read due to his absence, and in accordance with the rules of the Senate, the matter was deferred to Thursday.

With nothing more to discuss, the presiding at Tuesday’s session, Maryland County Senator H. Dan Morais, accepted a motion that the lawmakers recline to executive session.

Though the content of Senator Jallah’s communication was not revealed, it may be recalled that the Senator recently suggested that in order to fight and effectively contain the Ebola virus, there was a need to divide the country into three zones comprising five counties each.

 Senator Jallah, who chairs the Senate Committee on Internal Affairs and Governance, recently criticized and told his colleagues that the Task Force made a mistake to have established an Ebola center in the highly congested slum community of West Point.

Instead of using congested areas, the Senator proposed that Government considers building Ebola centers in isolated areas or places, especially rural communities not inhabited by human beings.

Another effective way to fight the Ebola epidemic, said  Senator Jallah in a recent debate, is for government to restrict the movement of all citizens within the country for one month period, and during that period certain trustworthy business people should be licensed to carry out supplies of needed goods to those areas.   

Senator Jallah cited the alarming figure from the World Health Organization (WHO), which estimates that about 20,000 people may die in the sub-region from Ebola before it is contained.

The once busy hub of political activities now looks near deserted, with individual lawmakers advised to reduce their workforce and send non-essential staff home until further notice, a strategy to help reduce the over-crowdedness of the Capitol Building in the wake of the Ebola epidemic.

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