‘Avoid Voting Deceptive Campaigners’

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Christopher Neyor, a senatorial candidate for Montserrado County, opened what promises to be an intense and expensive mid-term election last Thursday, with a statement that tries to define his opponents as “deceptive campaigners.”

Neyor, an electrical engineer-turned-politician said, he was describing his opponents’ campaigns as “deceptive” because, according to him, they are telling “too many lies to be trusted in the National Legislature.”

Montserrado County is already one of the nation’s prime battlefields in the Special Senatorial Election, and is also home to one of the most competitive campaigns for the National Legislature.

 “Should we allow them to bring their deceptive campaign that they are the best candidates for this county?” Neyor asked.  “I think that’s a ‘no’. We must defeat them.”

He made the assertion when he kicked-off his campaign on Thursday, November 20, in his birth place, in Mount Barclay outside of Monrovia.

Neyor stated that his opponents were engaging in “deceptive politic”, just to favor their way into winning the senatorial seat in the county.

However, he went on to say that his campaign, which he described as a “Crusader for Change”, would seek to end the reign of deceptive politicians who are misleading ordinary people to vote for them.

“As our crusade flourishes, we will be able to strengthen the belief that ordinary people can do what our lawmakers cannot do," he noted.

“Let us not be party to a mechanism to provide legitimacy to a select few, who create false impressions of change.  If we allow them to prosper again, expect the present and future lawmakers to be mere rubber stamps to favor their own agenda and interest,” he emphasized.

Neyor, who has previously served as CEO of the National Oil Company of Liberia (NOCAL) and as managing director of the Liberia Electricity Corporation (LEC) told his constituency that he is the best candidate that would ensure the protection of the oil and its revenue are evenly distributed.

 “Oil is the only God-given natural resource that we have to improve our lives and to develop Liberia, because our past blessings, like iron ore, rubber, have been mismanaged by deceptive campaigners, who have been profiting at our  expense,” Neyor maintained.

Montserrado County has been represented by the Congress for Democratic Change (CDC) incumbent, Senator Joyce Freeman Sumo, who is contesting the seat to challenge her political leader, Ambassador George M. Weah, as well as Liberty Party candidate Ben Snavee, Ms. Miatta Fahnbulleh and independent candidate Robert A. Sirleaf, who also happens to be one of the sons of President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.

Because the county is evenly split and because the President’s son is running, the race has drawn support and interest from outside the county.

CDC smells a chance to widen its lead to win the senatorial slot because most of the heavyweights in the House of Representatives have pledged support to Ambassador Weah, especially in fund raising.

Christopher Z. Neyor is the founder, president and CEO of the Morweh Energy Group, an energy consulting and Investment Company based in Monrovia.

 He has done advisory work as an energy expert and consultant in several countries and was co-author of a recent book on environmental cost-benefit analysis published in 2013 by the New York University.

Neyor was up to February 2012, President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the National Oil Company of Liberia (NOCAL).

He served as senior advisor on Energy, Environment and Climate to President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and spearheaded development of Liberia National Energy Policy which outlined strategy for power sector development and review of Liberia’s petroleum laws including the act creating NOCAL and development of human capacity across the energy sector.

He has led Liberia climate change negotiation at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

 Neyor was managing director of the Liberia Electricity Corporation (LEC) before the start of Liberia civil war in 1990, shortly after which he became a visiting scholar at the Center for Energy and the Environment at the University of Pennsylvania teaching in the early 90s.

He graduated from the Monrovia College as class valedictorian and did undergraduate studies in Electrical Engineering at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio, obtaining a Bachelor of Science (BSC).

He did his graduate studies in energy economics, at the University of Denver and management with a Master’s  and at Stanford University‘Graduate School of Business, from where he was awarded an MBA.

On the sports side, he was appointed as interim leader of the Mighty Barrolle Sport Association in 1987, where his leadership led the football club winning the Liberia Football Association Championship.

He was later elected president of the Association in 1997, but had to leave the country for political reasons, following the 1997 presidential elections.

Neyor has a track record of caring and giving back to the community, especially the empowerment of young people. He expanded the scholarship program at the LEC and other parts of the World.

At NOCAL he launched a scholarship program that recruited 12 students from each of 15 counties of Liberia for the future management of the country’s oil industry.

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