‘The Blood of Politicians Not More Important Than Yours,’ Cllr. Chesson-Wureh Advises Zogos

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Liberian gang members marching against elections violence

The head of the Women’s Situation Room, Cllr. Yvette Chesson-Wureh, says no politician’s blood is more important than those of children who are in the street.

Cllr. Chesson-Wureh made the statement yesterday at the Gang Youth Summit 2017 when dozens of street boys and girls commonly called “Zogos” gathered at the Paynesville Town Hall.

They sang and danced to promote peace before, during and after the elections in the country.

Liberians Gangs sang and danced peace song to promote peace during, before and after elections

She said she was very glad to see street boys and girls in their huge numbers and in a joyous mood saying ‘no to violence and yes to peace’ after the incoming results of the 2017 legislative and presidential elections.

Cllr. Chesson-Wureh told the gathering of youth not to waste their blood because someone wants to become a president, a representative or a senator.

“All I ask is where are the children of those people that are asking you to cause violence in Liberia? Are they better than you?”

She said while it is the right of citizens to support political parties, they must, however, not shed their blood for them, suggesting that the children of politicians who preach violence should be the ones to shed their blood for their parents.

The peace the country enjoys is in the hands of the youth, “and so if Liberia goes down, Africa will suffer because Liberians will have to flee to the various African countries,” she warned.

Peace is the only answer to the problems faced by Liberians; and as such, maintaining the peace is very vital to the country, Cllr. Chesson-Wureh stressed.

“Don’t waste your blood because someone wants to become a president, a representative or a senator”

She thanked eminent Liberian women and others from across Africa for joining Liberia to ‘maintain peace and say no violence’ during the electoral process. They included Madam Elizabeth Lwanga of Uganda, Madam Turrie Akepole of Nigeria, Ma Korpo Howard of the rural women of Liberia, Madam Hellen G. Nah of the Women Voices Newspaper and Mayor Cyvette M. Gibson, among others.

Edina Dema Wilson, who was once a Zogo, said Liberians living on the streets need rehabilitation and they are tired being called “gang boys and girls, or Zogos.”

Madam Wilson said the youth are tired of violence, and are voting for the betterment of their lives and a better future for Liberia.

She said securing the future of street boys and girls is important because they are involved in things that they do not have control over.

Madam Wilson said the children need counseling and medical attention to regain what they have lost.

“I went to big schools in Liberia but unfortunately for me, I found myself in life that I did not have control over but by the grace of God I was able to change,” she indicated.

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