“Our Education Ill is Beyond Short-term Closing”

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The principal of the Ganta United Methodist School (GUMS), says the country’s education problem is beyond short-term closing although decision by the Ministry of Education (MOE) to close school as of July 31 stands.

Mr. Roger S. Domah in a statement, he indicated that key stakeholders including the MOE need to sit and critically analyze the problem and identify those activities that best suit Liberian education system instead of rushing to close school, and be in conformity with educational calendar that others are using in their countries.

He said the “Messy” education system needs some hard decisions that will be unpopular and should be able to affect whoever it can since the intent is to correct the errors that have damaged the system.

Mr. Domah said besides the lack of competent Mathematics and English teachers in most schools as stated by the new Minister of Education, George Werner, there is a need to revisit the system of licensing schools and teachers; something he said has major role in bringing out mushroom schools that do not have the first facilities or the qualified teachers.

He stressed that this aspect of failure is directly associated with government, and if changes can be made, such error needs to be identified and worked on thoroughly to make changes that will suit Liberia’s education.

The GUMS Principal also said the government and stakeholders need to evaluate teachers with university degree; follow up the time spent at a university and the cause of staying for such time.

“We must also study and closely supervise the admission and employment processes in our school system; the quality of supervision during the administration and marking of West African
Examination Council (WAEC) administer examinations; the length of time spent by individual students especially at universities and the consequences of over staying; consequences for students who will not improve their academic performances after all efforts have been exerted, and a system to receive reports on education officers’ (Eos’) and other educational officials and bodies who are involved in “unethical conducts” or performing dismal even in the remotest parts of the Country.”

Mr. Dormah during last academic year fell in controversy with education authority of Nimba for booking his own student cheating on the WAEC Exam.

The county authority and others took him to the provincial capital, Sanniquellie on ground that his action to expose the student brought disrepute to the county.

Against this backdrop, Mr. Domah suggested that “The Ministry should also introduce an external examiner system where samples of tests from schools and universities will have second opinion especially for graduating seniors before they are given clearances.”

“I must express that our educational system for the past decade has been responsible for the massive indiscipline, corruptions, bad governance and all of the vices that Liberia is suffering from. Most of those working in our various public and private sectors today are performing the way they are doing because this is how they were processed-“encouraging you to make your way out instead of meriting your accomplishments,” he said.

He also indicated that the suggestion to revolutionize the education system should be intentional and must go beyond words, noting that they way the change is done may lead to failure or success.

He then called on the new MOE Administration to carefully handle the school matter without rushing in order to have a fruit results as the system is being spoiled not only by teachers or students, but government, school administration, parents and others.

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