Nursing Board Qualifies Several Teaching Institutions

0
205
LBNM Registrar Cecelia Kpangbbala Flomo delivers a statement at the occasion.

The Liberia Board of Nursing and Midwifery (LBNM), an umbrella organization overseeing activities of nurses, midwives and related learning institutions, has qualified several learning institutions in categories based on its evaluation of the affected institutions.

Under its Quality Assurance and Accreditation project, the LBNM released the results of its findings, accompanied by the accreditation action over the weekend at a resort in Monrovia focusing on 22 training institutions in the country.

The institutions include Adventist University of West Africa, Bomi County Community College, Bushrod Institute, Cuttington Junior College, Cuttington University, Deana K. Isaacson Midwifery Training Program, Esther Bacon School of Nursing and Midwifery, Greater Vision School of Nursing and Grand Bassa County Community College.

Others are Lofa County Community College, Lois Hangreen School of Health Science, Mabel McCombs School of Health Science, Mother Patern College of Health Sciences, New Eye Sight Center, Nimba County Community College and Phebe Para Medical Training School.

The rest of LBNM Training Institutions are Ruth Ramstand School of Health Science, Smythe Institute of Management and Technology, Tubman National Institute of Medical Arts, Tubman University, United Methodist University Midwifery Program and Winifred J. Harley School of Nursing.

The LBNM 2018 Assessment Results approved 10 schools for accreditation, 11 others for quality assurance and one post-basic school; taking into consideration four thematic areas, including classroom and instruction, clinical, infrastructure and administration.

According to LBNM Monitoring and Evaluation Director, Darboi Garmi Korkoyah, schools including Mother Pathern College of Health Sciences, J.J. Dossen Hospital, and Ruth Ramstand School of Health have high scores in the areas of infrastructure, management, Classroom, instruction and clinical, and Phebe Para Medical Training School 100 percent in Classroom and instruction.

As of the LBNM Accreditation Process, the Registrar, Cecelia C. Kpangbbala-Flomo said: “It is intended to maintain a national database of schools, set and monitor adherence to performance standards in Nursing and Midwifery education, distinguish and recognize institutions from illegal programs.”

It seeks national and international recognition, progression of Associate of Arts “AA” to Bachelor of Science “BSc” degree; presents the Liberian Board of Nursing and Midwifery (LBNM) recommendations to partners, and to provide the basis for comparison between programs and graduates.

Besides, it presents findings to National Nursing and Midwifery stakeholders, including presentation of findings to schools and collaborating to close identified gaps and maintain best practices.”

She said LBNM has observed that some institutions carry out over-recruitment of students when they do not have enough physical space or instructors to enable learning. “Some institutions have inadequate enough space to store maternal drugs, and other supplies,” Mrs. Flomo said.

At the end of the gathering, several recommendations including training institutions; work along with health faculties to fill identified gaps, and create an enabling clinical teaching and learning environment were advanced to the board.

The recommendations also urged hospital administrators to ensure that health facilities are properly monitored and equipped with both human and material resources, while some also called devising policy strategies that will guide supplies and human behaviors.  They also called for establishing partnerships with others to enable training opportunities for instructors and to build consistency in faculty retention.

Meanwhile, the LBNM has launched its Nursing and Midwifery Index aimed at tracking students entering the 22 nursing institutions up to the time any of them that would become successful sitting the state board test.

Leave a Reply