Celebration, Protest at Capitol over Speaker Nuquay’s Selection

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Women in favor of Nuquay's selection

The grounds of the Capitol Building – the Legislature, the official seat of Liberian Representatives and Senators, was yesterday the scene of emotional drama as two groups of women displayed opposing emotions over the selection of Speaker Nuquay as Unity Party vice standard bearer for the upcoming elections.

One group, calling themselves ‘Women from the Capitol Building,’ was made up of 40 women, some of who danced when they heard the news of Speaker Emmanuel Nuquay’s selection as vice standard bearer of the Unity Party, displaying placards that read: “Congratulations Incoming Vice President.”

Women from the Capitol celebrating Speaker Nuquay’s selection as Unity Party vice standard bearer

One of the organizers, Mrs. Ida F. Kamanor, said: “We are dancing to the selection of the Speaker of the House of Representatives; we are happy that he was chosen to run as vice standard bearer on the Unity Party ticket. And we are happy that the Speaker is the right choice.”

The dancing women were joined by some members and sympathizers of the Unity Party, including Deputy Minister for Youth Development, Rufus Neufville. “What’s the matter with Speaker Nuquay and what’s the matter with the Vice President?” Mr. Neufville shouted. “Alright,” the women responded.

The waiting-and-dancing women ended their jubilation with a word from the Speaker’s aide that the Speaker would dance with them on Thursday, July 13, because he had a tight schedule after his selection and the activities thereafter. The Speaker’s selection to contest as Vice President indicates that only 65 of the 73 incumbents will be vying to return to the House of Representatives.

Meanwhile, amid the celebration on one side of the Capitol Building, a smaller crowd with Nimba County Representative R. Matenokay Tingban and other anti-UP personalities were not so happy with the Vice President’s choice of running mate.

“He (Veep Boakai) let down Nimba, Bong and Grand Bassa counties by not selecting the right vice standard bearer, and would deeply split legislative politics,” was a statement heard at the gathering.

It may be recalled that on Monday, at the UP headquarters, Vice President Boakai named Speaker Nuquay as his running mate, because “this is someone that we trust.” He stated that Speaker Nuquay has demonstrated dedication and leadership ability in advancing the national interest. “The person we have chosen to be the running mate shares my vision to continually think Liberia, love Liberia and build Liberia,” Veep Boakai said.

In his acceptance speech, Speaker Nuquay lauded the VP for choosing him, described his selection as a blessing from God. “Today is indeed a great day that has been destined by God and least anticipated,” Nuquay said. “This is the will of God and I am humbled and happy to work along with the VP for the betterment of our country Liberia.”

Meanwhile, there were 10 Representatives at yesterday’s session, which was the 47th day sitting. As a result of the program where Nuquay was selected to run with the Vice President, there were not enough members in the House of Representatives for a quorum, for which session was cancelled. The House’s press director Isaac Redd confirmed to newsmen yesterday that the “cancellation of Tuesday’s session is because of no quorum.” According to the House’s rules and regulations, at least 36 members – bodily or officially absent – make up a quorum.

 

Author

  • I am a Liberian journalist, born November 7 and hailed from the Southeast and of the kru tribe. I began contributing to the Daily Observer 2008 and was fully employed in 2012. I am the 3rd of eight children and named after my great grandfather. Am happily married with three children (girls). I am a full member of the Press Union of Liberia (PUL) and also the Sports Writers Association of Liberia (SWAL) and the Legislative Press Pool (LEGISPOL). I can be contacted through email: [email protected] or cell number/WhatsApp: (+231) 0886585875 or Facebook.

10 COMMENTS

  1. Nimba County, we must learn to unite otherwise, we will never get anywhere. Stop the in house fighting and the better we will be. I do not regret the decision of VP Boakai to pick who he wants for his running mate, but I regret the behavior of certain individual within Nimba County.

    • You couldn’t have said it better, Daa. There has reportedly been serious silent rivalry among the ethnic groups of Nimba for this ONE VEEP post. The Maans, Daans, and Mandingoes were secretly lobbying for someone from their clan. To ease the tension and avoid confusion, the present VP decided to choose someone else. So since Nimbaians don’t’ speak with one voice anymore, let them bite the bullet. It was not only with VP Boakai.

      We reportedly heard that the rivalry was so intense in the LP camp too. Several names were sent. One ethnic group reportedly recommended over five names. Brumskine finally settled on Mr. Karnweay. We will continue to cast our ballots for other candidates if we don’t manage our political capital well devoid of tribalism. If Nimba wants to produce a candidate, the county must select someone who is marketable across the country, not only in Nimba. The late Jackson F. Doe was an example.He was easy to sell – in fact, he sold himself to the Liberian people. Do we still have the likes of Prof. Doe? Yes, but we might not find him or her if we continue on this ugly path of internal power struggle based on ethnicity.

    • You couldn’t have said it better, Daa. There has reportedly been serious silent rivalry among the ethnic groups of Nimba for this ONE VEEP post. The Maans, Daans, and Mandingoes were secretly lobbying for someone from their clan(s). To ease the tension and avoid confusion, VP Boakai chose someone else. So, since Nimbaians don’t’ speak with one voice anymore, let them bite the bullet. Interestingly, VP Boakai was not the only person faced with this problem in Nimba.

      The rivalry was even intense in LP, Brumskine’s party. One ethnic group reportedly recommended over five names while the others came up with just one or two. Faced with the same problem, Brumskine finally settled for Mr. Karnweay. We were our own problems here again.

      We will continue to cast our ballots for other candidates if we don’t manage our political capital well, devoid of tribalism. If Nimba wants to produce a candidate, the county must select someone who is competent and marketable across the country, not only in Nimba. The late Jackson F. Doe was an example. He was easy to sell – in fact, he sold himself to the Liberian people. Do we still have the likes of Prof. Doe? Yes, but we might not find him or her if we continue on this ugly path of internal power struggle based on ethnicity.

  2. only one person can be the running mate people. if he had chosen someone from Nimba, Bassa and Bong will say why not us. The same goes for any other county. Liberians need to look for competent LIBERIANS and not KINSMEN.

  3. Get outside the Capitol building fence next time to the public to do your canvassing. This building is for all Liberians. Not for one or two set of people, or parties. Party or not, every Liberian own this Legislative ground.
    Gone to 57% in silence.

  4. Did this incumbent dictate the election process with a 34% a year ago? What power did they /she have to say that “no win without a coalition”? Only God knows before hands who wins.
    Asking the voters. Gone in silence.

  5. Now it is time to go out there and get the votes for Boakai, I am onboard right now. This is the election that was stolen from the late Jackson F. Doe in 1985 by the Doe’s regime.

    Starting with Boakai presidency, the pioneer’s descendents will have to wait for150 years too before getting the presidency.

  6. Celebration and protest for what. Now I see where we are heading. Ignorant!
    My warning to young people in this election, the future of Liberia is in your hand. Don’t let anyone fool you.

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