Newly Dedicated Computer Lab Invigorates Bomi College

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Bomi County Superintendent Brown cuts the ribbon to declare the Computer Lab opened, as BCCC President Dr. Norman, second from left, and others look on

A large number of students of the Bomi County Community College (BCCC) yesterday rejoiced at the dedication of a new computer lab at the school’s campus in Tubmanburg.

Located in the same building that serves as the school’s auditorium, BCCC president Dr. Zobong B. Norman said the dedication was a great day for the students because the ratio of computers to the 30 students in the IT Department is one to one, instead of 1 to 10, as it was a year ago.

He said each of the computers has a 250-gigabyte capacity, high memory and a 24,000 BTU air conditioning system that makes it extremely easy for each of the 30 students to gain computer knowledge that they would use after graduation to hold their own in the highly competitive field of technology.

“Our goal is to make sure that the learning and teaching environment is conducive for every student in the department so that after you graduate from here you would have been computer literate to be able to compete in the technology-demanding skills out there,” he said.

Dr. Norman said while learning is not all academic, the administration would break-ground for the construction of a Student Center on Friday, April 21.

He noted that the administration subscribes to the various daily newspapers, which are available in the College library.  “We want you to know what is going around you and in the world so that you can hold intelligent conversations on national and world issues,” Dr. Norman said.

He added that his administration will pretty soon provide a media center on campus where students can watch programs on television.

Dr. Norman said the college will shortly receive 15 additional computers from his alma mater (Cornell University in the United States) to build an Internet center in Tubmanburg. “Discussions are going on with Bomi County authorities for a space for the project,” he added.

Bomi County Superintendent Samuel F. Brown, overwhelmed by the fast pace of development at the BCCC, commended President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf for sending Dr. Norman to head the college.

Before cutting the ribbon to declare the computer lab officially opened, Superintendent Brown said words were inadequate to express Bomi County’s appreciation for the good work at the BCCC. He urged the students to take advantage of the new innovations at the BCCC aimed at preparing them to face the challenging world outside.

Other speakers included Mr. Robert Gbangai, speaker of the Bomi County Traditional Council, who hails from the Mana Clan of Clay District.

Gbangai said the county is impressed with the developments at the BCCC, including the completion of the computer laboratory, and urged students to make use of the opportunity.

Ostensibly absent from the dedication were all the members of the Bomi County Legislative Caucus and the Board of Trustees, though the administration said they were invited.

It was the third time that members of the two groups have stayed away from important programs at the college, located at Fatoma Compound. They were also absent from the recent commencement convocation exercise and the day President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf announced Dr. Norman as the new president, more than a year ago.

Dissatisfied with their absence, President Sirleaf remarked that “if your house doesn’t sell you, strangers will not buy you,” a popular proverb that means although they are all from Bomi County, their absence showed scorn for her efforts to provide qualified Liberians to manage the college.

1 COMMENT

  1. More computers are signs of progress toward implementing computer skills in the community colleges. However, it would be of paramount importance if the author or writer provided his reader with some synopses of the courses offered at the college. Are these community colleges adequately preparing Liberian students to meet the demand of the future?

    It is time for Liberia’s secondary and junior colleges to reorient their curriculum and move toward a more robust educational system that incorporates more technical courses that are highly needed in rebuilding the country. There is an urgent need for Technical high schools and two years technical colleges in Liberia.

    We need technical schools and colleges that offer: Industrial & Transportation Technologies (commercial refrigeration, welding, electrical and computer technology, automotive technology, Motorcycle Service Technology, refrigeration technology); Public Safety and Security (Criminal Justice Technology, Basic Law Enforcement, Fire Science Technology); Health Professional Services ( Nurse Aide, Clinical Lab. Technology, Phlebotomy, Cosmetology, Medical Assisting, Barbering, Dental Assistant, Optical Lab. Tech); News Media(Computer Graphics and Design); Business Information System(Computer Information System, Accounting, Business & Marketing Management, Banking and Finance).
    These are relevant courses needed in some high schools and most especially in our two years technical colleges that will prepare our students for employment.

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