Who Sent NEC Staffer to Guinea for Elections Monitoring?

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Sekou Sackor, an Administrative Assistant at the NEC, traveled to Guinea apparently to observe that country's recent elections.

– For traveling on a ticket not bearing his name, Elections Commission distances itself from dubious arrangement

The Daily Observer has reliably gathered that staff working at the National Elections Commission (NEC) recently traveled through dubious means to Guinea to monitor the just ended Presidential and Parliamentarian elections.

It can be recalled that the people of Guinea recently went to the polls and elected President Alpha Conde for a third term, even though the election was marred by violence and deaths of a number of supporters of Cellou Diallo, Conde’s main political rival for many years now.

Details in possession of the Daily Observer explain that Sekou Sackor, who works in the office of Commissioner Boakai Dukuly, used a plane ticket intended for Mohammed Kanneh, an official at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, to travel to Guinea.

“No airline will allow a passenger to fly internationally when the name on their passport and the name on the ticket are not the same,” a travel agent who asked not to be named told the Daily Observer. Because of this, airlines are severely penalized for allowing such poor due diligence. “That the passenger was able to leave Liberia by air using a ticket bearing someone else’s name suggests that bigger hands were there to make sure he passed through,” the source said.

According to information gathered, Sackor was arrested in Togo when the Togolese immigration realized that the name in his passport and the one on the plane ticket he was using were completely different from each other. However, after a few calls and some political maneuvering, mainly from Monrovia, Sackor was allowed to continue his journey to Conakry, Guinea, as a member of the ECOWAS delegation from Liberia.

Sackor, the Daily Observer has been reliably informed, stayed at a hotel in Conakry but without money to pay his hotel bills due to the fact that he was an uninvited guest who was never recognized by the ECOWAS elections observer delegation to Guinea.

After being thrown out of his room, another member of the ECOWAS observer delegation who knew Sackor allowed Sackor to stay in [the delegate’s] room in Conakry. The ECOWAS observer delegate later assisted Sackor with money to return to Liberia by road.

Sekou Sackor, according to sources, has traveled to Guinea for previous elections in that sisterly West African country but was not picked for the most recent elections.

How Sackor got the plane ticket bearing the name Mohammed Kanneh of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs is yet to be known, but a source informed the Daily Observer that Commissioner Boakai Dukuly, chairman for the steering committee on the upcoming December 8 Special Senatorial Election, influenced the process.

When contacted, Commissioner Dukuly, through a text message distanced himself from Sekou’s dubious travel to Guinea.

“I or my office neither sent my Administrative Assistant, Sekou Sackor, nor anyone to observe the election in Guinea,” Dukuly’s text message said.

In response, the Executive Director of NEC, Mr. Anthony Sengbeh said the Commission is embarrassed by the information that a staff of the Commission traveled to Guinea under such criminal means, but it is no way a part of the act.

“I selected Mr. Emmanuel Hare to represent the Commission in Guinea because he fluently speaks French, the official language of Guinea. We selected no other person and, as such, we cannot account for that person who found his way to Guinea to represent us. We distance ourselves from it,” Sengbeh said via a mobile phone call yesterday.

Emmanuel Hare, the Daily Observer is impeccably informed, is a half brother to Davidetta Browne Lansanah, Chairperson of the National Elections Commission (NEC). He is her administrative assistant.

Sengbe, however, said that Emmanuel was selected not because he is related to the chairperson of the Commission or works directly with her but because of his maturity and fluency in speaking the French language.

“When my team of co-workers and I suggested Emmanuel, the chairperson had a problem with it. She didn’t want him to go but many other persons within the senior staff ranks vouched for him and expressed confidence that he could ably represent the image of the Commission in Guinea,” the NEC executive director said.

When asked as to what will the Commission do to Sekou Sackor, Sengbeh said the decision is in the purview of the Board of Commissioners (BoC) and he is confident that they will probe into Sackor’s controversial departure for Guinea.

Efforts to reach out to Mohammed Kanneh, the man whose name was surreptitiously used and some officials at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for a response proved futile.

With terrorism all around the world, including the sub-region, many pundits said Sekou Sackor should have been arrested and put in custody or processed and forwarded to court.

“It speaks nothing good about Liberia. That is extremely embarrassing and we hope the NEC will see reason and impress on Commissioner Dukuly to relieve Sackor of his post as an administrative assistant,” an insider at the NEC told the Daily Observer.

Another NEC source said: “With the way there was violence and people getting wounded, what if Sekou could have died in Guinea in the process? Obviously, the news would have been that [he was there] as an official of the Liberian National Elections Commission, even though he went there on his own and through criminal means.”

The Daily Observer, with all efforts, including attempts to get his phone number for a conversation on his involvement with the use of a ticket not bearing his name, did not get through to Sekou Sackor.

Author

  • David S. Menjor is a Liberian journalist whose work, mainly in the print media has given so much meaning to the world of balanced and credible mass communication. David is married and interestingly he is also knowledgeable in the area of education since he has received some primary teacher training from the Kakata Rural Teacher Training Institute (KRTTI). David, after leaving Radio Five, a broadcast media outlet, in 2016, he took on the challenge to venture into the print media affairs with the Dailly Observer Newspaper. Since then he has created his own enviable space. He is a student at the University of Liberia.

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David S. Menjor is a Liberian journalist whose work, mainly in the print media has given so much meaning to the world of balanced and credible mass communication. David is married and interestingly he is also knowledgeable in the area of education since he has received some primary teacher training from the Kakata Rural Teacher Training Institute (KRTTI). David, after leaving Radio Five, a broadcast media outlet, in 2016, he took on the challenge to venture into the print media affairs with the Dailly Observer Newspaper. Since then he has created his own enviable space. He is a student at the University of Liberia.

11 COMMENTS

  1. The country name is spoiled by these kinds of passports dealings for dubious political reasons. And George says he has no personal political involvements. Either in the sale of passports or appointing drug dealers to represent a once promising nation on the international stage, that nations around the world could count on politically.
    The slogan of no George, no Liberia has left the nation image as a toxic waste that no other country would like to deal with.
    Unless those very same nations having an image problem like Guinea and its President.
    So who had the passport fixed ? George did . Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha . Every dime in tha sale of the nation’s passports counts. It was the love for money that made George to seek the presidency. And it is the love for money that will forced to hang on to power. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ! No George no Liberia. But as voters, your have both George and Liberia. So what’s the crying about who sent NEC officials to Guinea ? Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ! But what the people do not know about George, will not hurt them. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ! What they do not know will not hurt them. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ! What A Great People ? What A Great Citizens As Voters? Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha !

  2. It’s very hard to outrightly determine who authorized the NEC staffer to travel to Guinea. The inquiring minds of Liberia are concerned and are in some cases furious about this. I really understand. For now, let’s put it this way….the staffer, Mr. Sekou Sackor is a rogue operator, but certainly not a loafer. He has a mouth. Sackor should be asked. By using his own mouth, Sackor will be able to say something!

    One of the problems of Liberia is the issue of rushing to judgement on almost every calamitous event or a minor one. Example, if a bee stains someone on his or her neck, a number of people will rush to judgement by saying, ‘there’s a reason for that or maybe someone did it”. Of course, people have a right to act and react. I can in no way restrict anyone who sets out to express himself or herself. But all too often, uninformed conclusions are drawn by my fellow compatriots without doing an investigation. Example, it is deplorable for an NEC staffer to travel under someone’s name into a foreign country. But, my question is….how reliable is this story? Can we ask a few more questions in order to know the truth and nothing but the full truth?

    Fingers:
    Even while no one knows exactly what happened and how it actually happened, fingers are about to be pointed, if people’s fingers aren’t being pointed already. Yes, people have a right to point fingers! But fingers shouldn’t be pointed at anyone without a substantial proof!

    • Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ! As always, according to the gospel of Hney, people have the right to act and react. But when that right is used, it never meets the approval of the so-called police officer that approves the right, Mr. Hney . Especially so when that right is used to point fingers at George and his CDC regime. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ! What A Hney Guy ? What A So-called Right Police ? Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ! But always using his police officer’s right to point fingers that the political leader of ANC is homosexual, but one should not point fingers at George. Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ! Funny Guy, Isn’t He That Funny ? Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha h ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ! Don’t point fingers.

  3. If this government means any real business, this guy should be suspended immediately awaiting a probe. That is how it would happen anywhere else that runs a government. It is disgraceful that a man who is supposedly sent to observe/monitor “free and fair” elections arrived on the scene fraudulently. That’s “Dead on Arrival”, we expect no credible report regarding that election from this guy. What What image does this incident project about Liberia ? Fire this guy!

  4. There’s nothing funny about what I said, James Davis. I just don’t know how you manage to laugh like that without groping for breath. Your last laugh was done 17 times with one (1) h. You will be good at doing television commercials!

    • Here we go again comrade Hney! The exchange between you and Mr. Davis is absolutely laughable but, that’s the reality we have on hand. What part of the story that you don’t deem credible and we have to hear from Sekou Sackor himself before believing the story? The only clarification we need from Mr. Sackor is, who authorized him the invitation from within the NEC to visit Guinea because, so far, the officials at the NEC has distanced themselves from him. Some higher authority did and Mr. Sackor is the only person that can name this higher authority.

      What point about people pointing fingers is absolutely normal because it was wrong especially the image of our country is at stake here comrade and damaging to start with. You have already condemned Mr. Sekou Sackor which was the right way forward but at the same time, here you are questioning the authenticity of the story? Then why did you condemned Mr. Sackor if you thought, the story was fake? That’s why your point was laughable to Mr. Davis and many out there that read to comprehend. If the administration meant seriousness, Mr. Sackor shouldn’t be employed as of now in Liberia, and investigations should be ongoing to determined who authorized Mr. Sackor to do what he did since authorities at NEC has distanced away from him. Let’s discuss Liberia. Peace

      • Comrade Hney! Those that are pointing at President Weah are wrong. Weah has nothing to do with what Sekou Sackor did. The problem here is, president Weah is brief on these illegal activities by his administrators and he says nothing and this is what bother some of us. Yes you did condemned Sekou in your first post.

        About the airline flying the lone star logo, I think you need to revisit the post and read the details because, Liberian government did not purchased the plane or maybe I got it wrong. This airline issue have been around for a while. Initially, the deal was arranged between the government of Liberia and some 3 Jordinians brothers in exchange to award the baggage handling to the 3 brothers at the RIA. That deal was intercepted by the U. S government on grounds that, they did not trust Arabs dealing with baggage handling at Liberia airport for security reasons. So this airline thing has been around for a while and somehow, a Ghanaian company came on board to realize this effort.

  5. That fool should have been jailed in Togo or Guinea for travel fraud. How can you have Sekou Sackor on your passport and travel with Mohammed Kanneh on your ticket?
    This guy should be investigatedi including authorityies at the RIA immigration. This kind of behavior has a negative outlook on Liberia.
    How did he arrive at the decission to go to Guinea as an election observer ?

  6. Comrade Joe Akoi,
    Said you, “the only clarification we need is who authorized him”.

    Joe, if you personally know the full details of how Sackor went to Guinea and got stopped in Togo, why do you want a clarification? On this issue, I am right and you are wrong.

    Finger-pointers…
    Some people have begun pointing their fingers at Weah! With all due respect, it’s preposterous! In order to point fingers, the finger-pointer must have a valid proof.

    Question:- Do you think Weah is so stupid that he will stoop to the level of a drifter and authorize a Liberian poll observer to travel to a foreign land by using someone’s name? What would be gained?

    Joe, I didn’t condemn Sackor at all! I did say that it’s hard to be believed that someone could travel under such a mysterious circumstance into a foreign land.

    I was in Liberia last year for a period of three good months. I ate the real Maryland county palmbutter at times with fresh meat and shrimp and crabs. But while there, a bizarre news broke about Weah. It was said that Weah wanted to take a vacation of “NTR”…. never to return. As it turned out, Weah didn’t say something like that. I am sorry to say this…… sometimes because of hatred, Weah’s critics accuse Weah without having a proof!

    I am not against people who have a difference with Weah neither will I brazenly attack anyone who wishes to express his or her disgust with the president. I believe in free speech. But my point is one of validity! The author tells us that when Sackor was stopped in Togo, a call was made from Liberia. Is that believable? By the way, who narrated the story of Sackor’s travel to the country of Guinea?

    C’on man. You guys can blame Weah anytime you wish. However, when a story breaks, let’s not be quick to lay the blame at anyone’s feet.

    Peace….

  7. Mr. Joe Akoi,
    In addition to my response above, I would like to also say that I couldn’t care less about James Davis’s laugh and others who laughed about what I said. People have a right to laugh whenever they want to. I know darn well that what I said is reasonable. I also believe that if I were opposed to Weah’s presidency, James Davis and those you claim to have laughed, would not laugh at all! Sadly, their laughter will not convince me one bit! I am a tough cookie…..

    The truth must be told:
    In terms of telling the truth, I have been very consistent. I have always said that Weah is not perfect, he is not righteous neither is he a saint. Since it is indisputable about the fact that Weah is not perfect, the possibility exists for Weah to commit errors in some instances.
    I understand Weah has to do more. However on the whole, Weah is trying.

    Lastly, a small-size commercial jet airliner has been bought for Liberia, not for Weah. That’s good news! The people who laugh 17 to 18 times will increase their laughter to 50 laughs. I know a critic whose laughter is louder than the wailing of an ambulance. The critic that I am talking about lives in the Paynesville area, but when he opens his mouth to laugh, his voice can be heard by people in downtown Monrovia. All he does is to laugh, laugh and laugh. He never talks about how he could help his country create a few jobs.

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