Mr. Prospere Kotchi Dies

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The late Prospere Kotchi

The death is announced of Mr. Prospere Kotchi, former Honorary Consul General of La Cote d’Ivoire to Liberia and former Advisor on Francophone Affairs of the Interim Government of African Unity (IGNU).

This sad event occurred on December 15, 2019, at the University Hospital Center in Bouaké, La Cote d’Ivoire, following a brief illness.  He was in his 69th year.

Prospere was born in Treichville, La Cote d’Ivoire, on September 30th, 1951.  His mother was Ms. Kotchi Suzanne and his father, Mr. Ajami, a Lebanese businessman resident in the Ivory Coast.

Prispere did his early education in the Ivory Coast where he later entered university.  He later migrated to Liberia and entered the Zorzor Teacher Training Institute (ZRTTI), where he both taught French and earned a Teacher Training Certificate.

He returned to La Cote d’Ivoire and worked for a while as a teacher before returning to Liberia to do business.

He met his wife to be, Ms. Hawah Goll, herself an educator, at a UNESCO Conference in Yamoussoukro.  Ms. Goll returned to Liberia following the conference but the two later reconnected when he relocated to Liberia.  They were married in early 1990 and the union was blessed with two children, Eric Assamoi and Anais Suzzane Kotchi.

In 1991, Mr. Kotchi was engaged by the Interim Government of National Unity (IGNU), led by Dr. Amos Sawyer, Interim President.  Mr. Kotchi served as Advisor on Francophone Affairs, working in Dr. Sawyer’s office.

Mr. Kotchi was later appointed Honorary Consul General of La Cote d’Ivoire in Liberia.

An avid footballer, he assisted in reactivating his beloved Barrolle Football Club and the Liberia Football Association.

The funeral will take place on February 8, 2020, in his hometown of Azaguie, Western Ivory Coast.

4 COMMENTS

  1. Condolences to the wife and children and may the soul of Mr. Prospere Kotchi rest in peace. He was an endearing gentleman with a ready smile I met while serving as national security adviser to the IGNU in those early days one hesitated referring to as ‘postwar’. Evidently, and sadly, that caution proved prescient.

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