More Water Shortages Hit Monrovia

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For the fifth time in less than three months, users of pipe-borne water connected to the Liberia Water and Sewer Corporation’s (LWSC) lines must once again contend with the inconvenience of water shortages in Monrovia and its environs.

During a weekend tour of some densely populated areas of Monrovia, hundreds of people were seen desperately searching for water.

Officials of the LWSC are yet to provide any explanation as to why the people of Monrovia continue to encounter hardships in securing safe drinking water even when they are paying for it.

The management of the LWSC has said on many occasions that pipe-borne water has been restored to several parts of greater Monrovia and its environs. In spite of these claims, access to water still remains an issue in these same areas.

LWCS’s customers continue to argue that the provision of the water on a sustained basis cannot be over-emphasized.

Despite many assurances from the LWSC’s managers and engineers that they are ready to meet consumers’ needs, the water corporation’s customers and other Liberians continue to experience water shortages on a regular basis.

The affected residents told the Daily Observer that their hardship has continued with no practical solution from the LWSC’s management in sight.

“As the Rainy Season is here, we need a reliable water source, so we can avoid water-borne diseases,” one business owner pleaded.

As a result of the recurrent water shortages, the presence of wheelbarrow water carriers to various homes and businesses is on the rise again. In some cases, not all of these water carriers have access to the LWSC’s various water pumps.

This creates a situation where people are forced to use water from unhygienic sources due to their desperate need.

The water carriers often expose the water to unhealthy elements as they transport the water from its source to their customers across the city center.

In encounters with some private water carriers during the weekend, they pointed out that getting safe drinking water from the LWSC’s hand pumps is a huge challenge due to the long distances of some of their locations in and around the city.

One water carrier, Milton Bear Sackie of Slipway, said some of the kiosks containing these pumps are situated in crime-prone communities.

He said going to these areas often poses a threat to their safety.

Another water carrier, Mary B. Norton, told the Daily Observer the situations at the various kiosks could be described as a ‘real nightmare,’ owing to the number of carriers that turn out daily in search of safe drinking water.

She said upgrading of the LWSC’s pipelines is critical to the provision of pipe-borne water to the people of Monrovia and other communities outside of the nation’s capital.

During the weekend tour, several isolated communities in Duala, Brewerville and Waterside sounded urgent appeals to the LWSC management to establish water pumps in their areas.

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