Rep. Candidate Charged with US$72K Theft

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Appears in court today

With 29 days to the October elections, Montserrado County District#4 Representative candidate Cecelia Siaway Teah, will today appear at Criminal Court ‘C’ to answer to the charge of theft of property.

Madam Teah, a wife of retired Armed Forces of Liberia Colonel and Special Commando Lieutenant-General John Teah, has allegedly converted to her personal use US$72,500 entrusted to her care to purchase materials for Basilia Resource Group (BRG), a company she helped to establish.

As the company’s country representative, Madam Teah is charged with misapplication of entrusted property, but during today’s hearing, the court will ask her to answer to her indictment (charges) after it has been read in court to determine whether or not she actually committed the act.

Between 2016 and 2017, defendant Teah, the court document alleges, encouraged the company’s chairman, Sunday A. Popoola, residing in the United States of America (USA), to appoint her as Liberia’s representative of the group with responsibility to deposit and withdraw money from the corporation’s account at the United Bank of Africa (UBA)-Liberia Limited.

With her new position, the document claims, Mr. Popoola on two separate occasions, transferred US$32,000 and US$46,000 totaling US$78,000 to defendant Teah to deposit into BRG’s account.

But the record alleges that out of the US$78,000, Teah withdrew US$44,000 from the company’s account without being authorized to do so by Popoola.

Besides, the court record also alleges that US$25,000 and US$3,500 was entrusted unto defendant Teah’s care for the sole purpose of purchasing materials for the company, which money, she allegedly converted to her personal use.

These are some of the questions, defendant Teah is expected to answer today when her trial starts.

Madam Teah  is not the only candidate to be taken to court for debt in the upcoming elections.

The Daily Observer reported in mid-August that Dr. Jeremiah Whapoe, standard bearer of the Vision for Liberia’s Transformation (VOLT) Party, was ordered arrested by the Judge of the Monrovia City Court for failure to pay back a debt in the amount of US$1,800, which he reportedly borrowed to purchase campaign materials. Dr. Whapoe reportedly fled to the United States thereafter to avoid being arrested by officials of the City Court. He resurfaced, and at the just ended Tubmanburg Presidential Debate, promised to provide 20,000 jobs for Liberians on an annual basis if elected president of Liberia.

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9 COMMENTS

  1. I am sorry for saying this do not trust anyone with your hard earned money just like that please make sure before you cry like me one day.

  2. Ninety-nine percent of Liberians are dishonest. You just can’t trust these people with money or anything of value. They want to live the good life by stealing other people’s money…very bad!

  3. As H.L. Mencken says, “the chief value of money lies in the fact that one lives in a world in which it is overestimated”! Notwithstanding, contentment is found in cottages and huts than in castles and mansions. Hence the question lingers as to whether all this VEHEMENCE by candidates to attain elective positions, to the extent of some being “ordered arrested by the Judge of the Monrovia City Court for failure to pay back a debt in the amount of US$1,800, which he reportedly borrowed to purchase campaign materials”; is it because of these candidates love for country, public service, or simply patriotic ideological conviction?? Someone quipped supra that “Ninety-nine percent of Liberians are dishonest.”

    But we can tell you, my friend, after probing other Africans, and to be fair, others across the globe, you will praise Liberians for being honest when it comes to money!!! And this is because people generally overestimate the value of money, not realizing that contentment is ACTUALLY found in cottages and huts than in castles and mansions.

  4. As H.L. Mencken says, “the chief value of money lies in the fact that one lives in a world in which it is overestimated”! Notwithstanding, contentment is found in cottages and huts than in castles and mansions. Hence the question lingers as to whether all this VEHEMENCE by candidates to attain elective positions, to the extent of some being “ordered arrested by the Judge of the Monrovia City Court for failure to pay back a debt in the amount of US$1,800, which he reportedly borrowed to purchase campaign materials.”

    Thus the question: is it because of these candidates´ love for country, public service, or simply patriotic ideological conviction that candidates may even compromise their reputation or sacrifice their conscience to the extent of killing and as mentioned in the story above??

    Someone quipped supra that “Ninety-nine percent of Liberians are dishonest.”But we can tell you, my friend, after probing other Africans, and to be fair, others across the globe, you will praise Liberians for being honest when it comes to money!!! And this is because people generally overestimate the value of money, not realizing that contentment is ACTUALLY found in cottages and huts than in castles and mansions.

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