Man, 38, Charged with US$26,000 Theft

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    Defendant Oscar Holmes dressed in a blue_web.jpg

    A 38 year -old man accused of misapplying US$26,000, after leasing a story building belonging to Edward Davis, who resides in the United States of America (USA) has been charged and forwarded to the Monrovia City Court for prosecution.

    Defendant Oscar Holmes was charged with the commission of the crime “Theft of Property” by the Liberia National Police (LNP).

    He was said to have leased the property in 2013 for five (years), to the Jesus Christ Church of Latter Day Saints.

    The one story building is situated in the Bong Mines Bridge community in Monrovia.

    Holmes has denied the charge.

    But in a complaint filed against defendant Holmes on behalf of Edward Davis, by his legal counsel, Atty. Daliamah Sulonteh, the lawyer alleged that, while his client was in the USA, he (Davis) authorized the defendant in Liberia to lease his property.

    He further alleged, after Holmes got the authorization, he (defendant) immediately entered into a five (5) years lease agreement with the Jesus Christ Church of Latter Day Saints, from which he,  defendant Holmes, allegedly collected the amount of US$26,000  from the church. 

    Unfortunately, the Atty. Sulonteh claimed, defendant Holmes converted the money into his personal use.

    But, according to police, during their investigation, on September 17, Holmes decided to remain silent, meaning he never wanted to say anything to the police. He apparently wanted to do so at a court’s hearing.

    However, at Friday’s hearing, Magistrate Kennedy Peabody allowed the legal counsel of defendant Holmes to sign for his release and to ensure that he appears on Monday, October 6, to answer to the crime for which he had been charged.

    Magistrate Peabody’s action may have been attributed to an appeal made recently to Magistrates throughout the country by Chief Justice Francis Korkpor of the Supreme Court of Liberia.

    Chief Justice Korkpor, in his appeal, advised magistrates to use what he considered as “descriptive power” to either detain or arrest would-be  criminals.

    The Chief Justice’s decision was part of the Liberian  Judiciary’s effort to prevent overcrowding at prisons, which may likely cause several death, if  there would have been an the outbreak of the Ebola virus there.

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