LNRCS Identifies with Underprivileged Children

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The Liberia National Red Cross Society (LNRCS) has identified with children it considers as underprivileged in Kakata, Margibi County.

LNRCS donated food and several school and hygiene supplies to 75 orphans and vulnerable children in that county.

The donation, according to LNRCS Secretary General, Fayiah Tamba, is the entity’s way of identifying with vulnerable children, especially those made orphan by the Ebola virus disease (EVD).

“The EVD outbreak greatly affected every sector and segment of the Liberian society leaving behind many unfavorable situations that would take time to heal,” LNRCS SG observed.

The materials were provided through the Liberia Chapter of the Society by the Turkish Red Cross to help orphans in the Ebola recovery phase.

The Coordinator for youth and volunteers of the LNRCS, Arthur Becker, during the donation of the items said, the supplies were intended to assist children who lost their parents and are facing challenges that require humanitarian intervention to improve their circumstances.

The Red Cross worked with Margibi County’s Health Team, local authorities, Ebola Survivor’s Network and civil society organizations in identifying orphanages and caregivers that equally benefited from the donation.

Mr. Tamba earlier stated that the Red Cross is moving full steam ahead with recovery, “because there are many people who have been left in a vulnerable situation as a result of the Ebola virus that ravaged the country.”

“From health problems to loss of livelihood or deaths of the main family breadwinners, many people need our help to get back on their feet”, Mr. Tamba added.

He said the Red Cross will continue to provide a range of practical help focusing on the most vulnerable groups including orphan children and single mothers with assistance ranging from cash, food and non-food items to agricultural training and equipment as well as livelihood and skills training.

“The ultimate goal of the Red Cross post-Ebola recovery,” according to Mr. Tamba, “is to re-establish the conditions for a quick return to a healthy society, with viable livelihoods, psychosocial well-being, economic growth, and overall human development that can foster a more inclusive society in the future.”

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