‘Let Us Emulate His Legacies’

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President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has said the passing of the former Chairman of the National Transitional Government of Liberia (NTGL), Charles Gyude Bryant calls for all political affiliations in the country to institute new programs that would enable all Liberians to emulate his legacy.

The Liberian leader described the late Chairman, who helped restore peace after 14 years of instability in the country, as “Peaceful, but mentally dynamic, astute and engaging, kind and resourceful, a gentleman in every sense of the word, with a penetrating mind, even in the most difficult of times.”

President Sirleaf made these assertions when she delivered a Panegyric last week on behalf of her government and people of Liberia at the funeral service of the former fallen NTGL Chairman. The service was held Wednesday, May 14 at the Trinity Cathedral Episcopal Church in Monrovia.

The Liberian government was requested by family members not to give the late statesman a state funeral. Family members said it was willed by Chairman Bryant that government has nothing to do with his funeral.

The Liberian President told the audience that the late Bryant was a winsome personality of deep, unpretending humility, foresight and concentration, which portrayed nobility of character and strength of conviction.

She noted, “His instincts served him and his country very well, and in trying or vexing situations, he was tolerant in a generous way, allowing the gush of fresh wind to blow through the halls of misunderstanding, shortcomings and obstacles.”

President Sirleaf, whom the late chairman peacefully guided in leading to the process of her ascendancy, said he demonstrated vast knowledge of national affairs, underpinned by patience, understanding and a sympathetic attitude to the problems, and willingness to be of assistance when convinced of the necessity that justifies it.  She said these attributes that the fallen NTGL Chairman had, inspired the nation.

She said the people of Liberia shared a deep sense of grief occasioned by the death of this pre-eminent Statesman who served and led his country from the shackles of destruction and bore the torch of the democratic order; who served his country magnificently as a business icon with great understanding and zeal to propagate and restore the image of his beloved nation.

“The sorrow of the Liberian people at the passing of so great a man, who signified to the world a new air of hope and peace, is being expressed by this celebration of his home going,” she pointed out.

As a mark of last respect and a tribute to the late Chairman Bryant’s memory, President Sirleaf called upon all to give due reverence and reflection to this memory.

“Let it be celebrated throughout the length and breadth of Liberia by its people at home and abroad, as a day of rejoicing and happy recompense, as well as a day of fondest familiarity and family hood,” she said Liberians should be reminded of how Chairman Bryant superbly navigated the tumultuous sea of self-destruction to bring Liberia into the harbor of national reconciliation.

The Bishop Jonathan B. B. Hart, in his funeral discourse, said that membranes of the former chairman will forever remain in the hearts of every Liberian because he was the one who heal the wounds of the nation after over years of brutalities in the country.

Bishop Hart noted that the late chairman risked his life in ensuring that peace and tranquility returned to his mother land; a country he loved so dearly.

One of the three children of the late chairman, Charles Mleh Bryant, said that their father thought them the sense of humility, respect for others and the fear of God. “I will really miss my daddy because he was a true friend to all of us,” he said with tears rolling down his eyes.

Meanwhile, the Trinity Cathedral was the scene of massive turnout of sympathizers including government officials, fraternity brothers and sisters, old friends, former schoolmates, business partners, among others.

Following the funeral service, the late chairman’s remains were taken on a cortege with appropriate military escort to its final resting place in the township of Crozierville, Montserrado County where internment took place in the old churchyard of the Christ Episcopal Church.

Charles Gyude Bryant, born January 17, 1949, died on April 16, 2014 in his 65th year. As Chairman of the NTGL from October 2003 to January 2006, Chairman Bryant is credited for fully implementing the mandate of the government as outlined in the Accra Peace Accord.

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