‘Go to Court if Aggrieved by Poll Outcome’

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FIND Executive Director Tells Candidates

As the National Elections Commission (NEC) today begins to release provisional results of the October 10 presidential and legislative elections, the Executive Director of the Foundation for International Dignity (FIND) has encouraged parties with grievances following the announcement of the final vote tallies, to take them to the Supreme Court.

Roosevelt Woods, during a press conference in Monrovia recently, urged the candidates and their parties to take advantage and work within the law to resolve any election dispute.

Woods, whose organization served as election observer, said the election commission has an effective dispute resolution system and parties should ensure that they follow those processes, adding, “I have full confidence in the court to arbitrate in  election disputes should this be needed.”

“We affirm the conviction that the judicial process, the judicial system of the country and the election laws themselves make full and adequate provision for accountability in this election,” Woods said. “Inciting people into violence because of the outcome of the results will not help to sustain the peace we are enjoying.”

The FIND boss urged candidates to exercise patience while awaiting the election commission’s announcement of official results because violence has not been able to take the country anywhere and it will never help in the country’s development agenda.”

Woods also reminded candidates to abide by the several declarations to which they affixed their signatures and to ensure that the country remains peaceful.

He said his organization will play a major role in making sure that those who will incite people to carry out violence to destroy lives and property are held accountable for their action.

“Anybody who incites people to get in the streets to cause any damage will be held responsible and prosecuted under our law,” the FIND boss noted.

According to Woods, NEC took several steps to ensure that the process was free, fair and transparent by increasing the number of civil society organizations to observer the process.

“Accrediting more civil society organizations was necessary because we were there to offer our opinions regarding the process and to work closely with the electoral body to ensure the exercise was free, fair and credible,” Woods said.

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