Ganta Streets Pavement On Going

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The current of the road stage of the ongoing road work

The pavement of two of Ganta’s streets is on going, with the construction firm carrying on the surface dressing at certain portions and the laying of culverts at other portions.

One of the two stretches of roads or streets, commonly known as Bangla Road, connects the Paynesville-Ganta Highway to the Ganta-Saclepea Highway, while the other connects Ganta main street to the Bangla Road, also known as the “Ganta back road”.

According to Public Works Resident Engineer of Nimba, Mr. G. Francis Carter, the pavement of the streets is carried on by the authority of Nimba in collaboration with the USAID-funded Feeder Road Alternative Maintenance Program (FRAMP).

Mr. Carter said the county is responsible to carry the earth works, including the laying of culverts, while the FRAMP is going to the surface dressing up to the completion of the roads.

He put the total kilometers of roads under construction to about 5.4 kilometers, the “Bangla Road or Ganta back road” is 3.9, while from Ganta main street to the back road is about 1.9 kilometers.

The construction of the road started last year, but it stalled due to the rain season and also budget shortfall in the local government in Nimba. The cost of the project is yet to be established.

The pavement of the Ganta streets is carried on by the authority of Nimba in collaboration with the USAID-funded Feeder Road Alternative Maintenance Program (FRAMP).

At present, FRAMP is underwriting some costs of the earth work in order to speedy the work, since the county is said to be facing financial at this movement, Mr. Carter has said.

The pavement of the Ganta Back Road or Bangla Road is likely to further boost socio-economic activities in the commercially booming city of Ganta, by opening another trading center off the main street.

One of the suggestions from the land dispute settlement in Nimba, especially Ganta in 2006 was to open up most streets/alleys so as create another corridor for businesses, since the land dispute was centered around the main street.

In so doing, the UNMIL began the opening of some of the streets, but could not continue, because it involved laying of culvert, which requires more money.

A UNDP sponsored NGO known as “InterPeace’ contracted a firm to do the culvert work, where few bridges were constructed in the process. Since then the entire work came to a halt until 2013, when the county equipment were used to extend the opening of the streets.

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