Marriott Signs Historic Franchise Deal for Hotel in Monrovia

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The Four Points by Sheraton Monrovia, expected to open in 2020

New project near Monrovia City Hall to become Liberia’s first internationally branded hotel

Pioneering hospitality management company, Aleph Hospitality, on Monday, February 11 announced the signing of a franchise agreement with Marriott International for the first Four Points by Sheraton hotel in Liberia. Located in the capital city, Monrovia, the hotel is due to become the first internationally branded hotel in the country upon opening in 2020 and will be managed by Aleph Hospitality under the Four Points by Sheraton brand.

According to a statement from Aleph Hospitality, the landmark property is ideally situated in the city’s central business district, adjacent to the United Nations mission and in close proximity to a number of government organizations and commercial offices. It will offer 111 stylishly appointed guest rooms to the capital’s expanding business traveller base, along with meeting facilities and a multitude of food and beverage outlets, including one all-day-dining venue, one speciality restaurant, a beach bar and grill and a rooftop bar. Guests will also be able to take advantage of a gym, spa, swimming pool and access to the beach. The hotel will boast Four Points by Sheraton’s approachable design and excellent service and reflect the brand’s promise to provide what matters most to today’s independent travelers.

The opening of the hotel will play a vital role in helping to realize the country’s tourism strategy, which aims to deliver 15 million international visitors by 2023.

“With President Weah announcing plans just last month to greatly simplify the visa entry system and look to develop a national tourism board to drive inbound visitor numbers, Liberia looks set to significantly grow its share of voice in the African tourism industry,” commented Bani Haddad, Managing Director, Aleph Hospitality.  “The increasing number of international guests will bring with them a strong demand for international quality accommodation and we greatly look forward to managing the operations of the hotel to world-class standards and making the Four Points by Sheraton Monrovia the destination of choice in the city.”

Expected to create over 100 new jobs when open, the hotel, which is owned by Sea Suites Hotel LLC, will be operated by Aleph Hospitality under a third-party management model. This model, ubiquitous in the U.S. and European hotel industries but in its infancy in Africa, is proven to deliver superior value for the owner through a combination of the benefits afforded by an international brand married with a highly-focused and personalized management approach aligned to the interests of the owner.

“By appointing Aleph Hospitality to manage our hotel, we have secured not only one partner but two, with Aleph executing a franchise agreement for the Four Points brand which would not have been possible if we were managing the hotel ourselves,” said Joe Barbar, President of Sea Suites Hotel LLC. “We look forward to the hotel opening and creating history as the first internationally branded hotel in the country.”

Founded in 2015, Aleph Hospitality is an approved operator of all of the major international hotel brands and serves clients across Africa stretching from Monrovia to Mombasa. The company also operates independent unbranded hotels such as the 115-room Getfam Hotel in Addis Ababa, offering owners the opportunity to tailor make the optimal management structure for their asset.

14 COMMENTS

  1. A wise person once said, “Happiness has many roots, but none more important than security.”

    After so many years of conflict and suffering, it seems happiness is finally returning to Liberia. However, happiness without security is dead.

    It is good to see a new five star hotel anticipated to be built in Monrovia that would help create jobs in Liberia and also beautify the city.

    However, that corridor around the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, University of Liberia, and the City Hall is already congested. Why can’t the Liberia Ministry of Information, Culture Affairs & Tourism (MICAT), solicit hotel and hospitality investors to look at other less congested prime locations around the city of Monrovia…like the old Ducor Palace, or somewhere around Hotel Africa to build a new hotel or resort?

    Are investors turning down development of the old bombed-out Ducor Intercontinental Hotel because it is not structurally sound to be renovated into a modern hotel? Or, are they turning it down because it would cost a huge investment to build a brand new hotel at that prime location?

    There are too many bombed-out structures still creating eyesores to international visitors coming to Liberia for the first time. These dilapidated buildings need to be torn down and have some modern edifices put in their place to create jobs and also to beautify the city.

    Yes indeed, a new hotel helps create jobs and it also beautifies the city. However, security and crime reduction should be of primary concern to the leaders of Liberia if they are opening Liberia’s door to both domestic and foreign investors.

    Remember, “Happiness (in job creation) has many roots, but none more important than security of the people.”

  2. Investors decide where and what they want to invest in. I don’t think government directs investors to any site where they want a hotel to be built, for example. Let Liberians who have interest in preserving Ducor lead an effort to save Ducor and restore it. Liberians are fond of looking to others to do what they themselves could do. And also telling other people what should have been done, without doing it themselves! I think this has to stop! Even Liberians living in the West and see what private initiative and private capital can do, still seem to find it difficult in getting rid of this mentality! Let Liberians who want to restore Ducor form a company and convince an international group to restore Ducor. Tell them of the ideal location and history of the hotel. That is what these people have done. But do not try to dictate or suggest to people who were working when you were sleeping!

    • Mr Williams; as you perhaps know. The Ducor was built and OWN by Inter-Continental Hotel Group. There’s no need to search for interested investors. The Ducor already have an owner- Inter-continental Hotel Group. They have one of the best know-how in the Hotel Business; already established. Liberia should encourage Inter-continental Hotel Group by giving them incentives and tax breaks to rebuild Ducor Palace and return it to its once glory days of high rating; “A FIVE-STAR HOTEL” in Monrovia, Liberia. I don’t see any group of LIBERIANS that’s capable at the moment, to rebuild Ducor Palace Hotel to its previous “STATUS”. Perhaps, you know of such group. If you please, let’s hear about them.

  3. Suggestions of three wise men. Let’s take a listen……

    The first wise man says that the “Marriott Hotel deal means jobs for my brothers and sisters in Liberia! For sure, the management team of the proposed hotel will be unable to wipe out unemployment, but the creation of approximately 100 service jobs will help”. When the gentleman was asked, where he got his number of approximately 100 jobs, the wise man respectfully replied, “my people, that’s my projection. Y’all will blame me”?

    Without starting any conflict with Weah’s critics, the second wise man said, “Weah deserves to be given credit because of this hotel deal”. When the second wise man was asked why he thought Weah needed to be given any credit, the wise man replied, “because foreign investors from the USA are convinced that Weah’s government is headed in the right direction”.

    The third and final wise man came up with a prediction. Said he, “many investors will hit the shores of Liberia in the near future”. Again, when the third wise man was asked to explain to his audience why he came up with such a prediction, the gentleman replied, “the Liberian economy is beginning to show positive signs of recovery”.

    Those who sat in the room were very patriotic. Of course, Weah’s critics were in the audience. But unfortunately, the rebellion of Weah’s critics was swamped! The supporters of Weah shouted at the three wise men in unison….”May God bless Weah for trying. May God bless Liberia for this remarkable hotel deal”.

    Each man and woman went about their business after the gathering.

  4. Alpha Conneh

    Great insights!

    One attention-getter in your response is security. International investors will not blindly pump funds into an environment that is frightening. Instead, they will always prefer playing the wait and see attitude. Too many events have already occurred in Liberia just in one year’s time, which are enough to even cause indigenous business owners to have a second thought about investing in the economy of their own country.

    And because politics and the economy are intertwined, instabilities in Liberia’s political atmosphere will surely beget instabilities within its national economy.

    The inconvenient truth is that the issues that are the sources of the structural and systemic stress cannot be ignored; they must addressed.

    • I was in Monrovia last week and to my dismay, the entire city is dark at night. What happened to the street lights that the past government installed? The government needs to light up the city.

  5. Well I think this is a good move towards the development of our nation and its about time that young entrepreneurs of Liberia of which am no exception to put on our thinking cap so as to fit into the 2023 agenda as it relates to business opportunities. Gentleman we need not be spectators on fence and just watch match, a hint to the wise is sufficient.

  6. Mr. Elvin McIntosh

    Great thoughts Brother McCintosh; however, in the extremely intriguing world of Liberian politics and its high unpredictability, one wonders if it is really possible for Liberians to ever become the true players of their own economy?

    Please permit me to refer you to an article that was published just a few days ago on Frontpageafrica, concerning the disappointment expressed by a Liberian businessman, Mr. Amin Modad, who bidded to become one of the key players in the lobby management of the newly built Roberts International Airport terminal (RIA) and according to the publication, he was given an unfair treatment; relegated to a lower position, and denied in the bidding process.

    At last the opportunity was then given to a business partner of the president, who resides in Ghana. I’ll let the article and the video speak for themselves (https://frontpageafricaonline.com/).

    If the accounts of the story are true, then as old as our country is, economic empowerment is still a far-fetched dream for the average Liberians.

    If the powers that be are serious about liberianizing or indigenizing the economy, so to speak, then they must match their words with deeds. Government programs, policies, and incentives must be strategically wedded with the entrepreneurial spirit and skills of our Liberian businessmen. Is that not the right way to go?

  7. which plane will bring this 15 million international visitors? Which street will they walk on? Empower our local hotel owners and tell that Jefferson Kojee to get off his fat butt and get to work. Is Weah scared of that small boy that he cannot fire him? No visitors coming here when Morlu say there will be assassination. Investors don’t like trouble.

  8. Mr. Elvin McIntosh

    Great thoughts Brother McCintosh; however, in the extremely intriguing world of Liberian politics and its high unpredictability, one wonders if it is really possible for Liberians to ever become the true players of their own economy.

    Please permit me to refer you to an article that was published just a few days ago on Frontpageafrica, concerning the disappointment expressed by a Liberian businessman, Mr. Amin Modad, who bade to become one of the key players in the lobby management of the newly built Roberts International Airport terminal (RIA); and, according to the publication, he was given an unfair treatment; relegated to a lower position, and denied in the bidding process.

    At last the opportunity was then given to a business partner of the president, who resides in Ghana. I’ll let the article and the video speak for themselves (https://frontpageafricaonline.com/).

    If the accounts of the story are true, then as old as our country is, economic empowerment is still a far-fetched dream for the average Liberians.

    If the powers that be are serious about liberianizing or indigenizing the economy, so to speak, then they must match their words with deeds. Government programs, policies, and incentives must be strategically wedded with the entrepreneurial spirit and skills of our Liberian businessmen. That is the right way to go.

  9. It is a good investment to have a new five stars internationl hotel in the city. We can also rally to push our government to bring in different group of investors to develop the Ducor Hotel. Until then, we can embrace what we have and expand from it!

  10. Great for Liberia and for international guest. Only hope Liberians can take pride in cleaning their surrounding, restore and maintain existing buildings as well as an efficient utility service. Let’s face it…Monrovia is filthy and traffic is like the wild west. Law and order must prevail over such gross corruption.

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