Former President Sirleaf to Speak at Hogan Lovells 7th Africa Forum

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Former President of Liberia, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

Global law firm Hogan Lovells has announce that Nobel Peace Prize Winner and former Liberian president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, will form part of its line-up of prestigious panelists and speakers at the seventh annual Hogan Lovells Africa Forum. Hogan Lovells is an American-British law firm co-headquartered in London and Washington, D.C.

It was formed on May 1, 2010 by the merger of the American law firm of Hogan & Hartson and the British law firm Lovells.

Hogan Lovells has around 2,800 lawyers working in more than 40 offices in the United States, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa and Asia.

In 2013, Hogan Lovells was the eleventh largest law firm in the world by revenues, earning around US$1.8 billion (£1.1 billion) that year. By 2017, the firm had risen to 7th worldwide with gross revenues exceeding US$2 billion. Hogan Lovells claims specialization in government regulatory, litigation, commercial litigation and arbitration, corporate, finance, and intellectual property.

This highly anticipated event, which will be held virtually on Monday, July 20, will delve deep into business-critical dialogues surrounding Africa’s growth and sustainability.

“We at Hogan Lovells are very excited to have so many influential and respected individuals from different industries join our discussions at this year’s Africa Forum,” says Andrew Skipper, Head of Hogan Lovells Africa Practice. “We are particularly thrilled to have President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf as part of our event, as she is a global leader of freedom, peace, justice, women’s empowerment, and democratic rule.

As Africa’s first democratically-elected female head of state, she led Liberia from 2006 to 2018 through reconciliation and recovery following the nation’s decade-long civil war, as well as the Ebola Crisis, winning international acclaim for achieving economic, social, and political change.”

This year’s Africa Forum comes in the midst of the global pandemic, COVID-19, which has had and will continue to have, a fundamental impact on the way we do business in Africa, from Africa, and across Africa.

The additional burden of climate change, which the continent is one of the most vulnerable to – although it contributes the least to global warming – makes the issue of sustainability a relevant focus area for how Africa’s industries can grow.

The event will consist of a number of sessions, all having Africa and its growth as their focus.

These sessions will include: Championing Africa – this panel, which will include Rakesh Wahi, Co-founder & Vice Chairman at ABN Group (CNBC Africa & Forbes Africa) will address questions like,

“How do you grow in a sustainable way regardless of the size of your business?” and “How do you promote a positive narrative for Africa in a constantly evolving market place especially in a time of global crisis?” Financing for impact – Financial institutions the world over are increasingly turning to investments that embed sustainability, meet SDG and ESG targets, and have a positive impact on all stakeholders.

Africa should be benefiting from this growing appetite and the continent doesn’t lack opportunities. Panelists for this session will include Ibukun Adebayo, Director and Co-Head Emerging Markets at London Stock Exchange Group; Christopher Kirigua, Regional Head of Sustainable Finance for Africa at Standard Chartered Bank; and Nieros Oyegun, Head of Network – The Africa List at CDC Managing risk in times of uncertainty – This session will examine the importance of managing risks in light of the current state of the global economy following the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The discussion will cover lessons learned from managing COVID-19 related risks – what has worked well and what strategies can be used for dealing with risk allocation for past, present, and future projects in a sustainable way.

Africa beyond COVID: the role of government and the public sector in defining and delivering a new positive and sustainable narrative – Africa is arguably disproportionately impacted by climate change and while demographics are working in our favor, as well as disruptive changes in the global supply chain that could result in less reliance on international suppliers, how can government and external investor countries balance the need to develop with the need for sustainability? Four prominent public officials from wide-ranging parts of the continent, including Tarek Ahmed Ibrahim Adel, Ambassador of Egypt to the United Kingdom, and Dr. Fatimata Dia, Ambassador of Senegal to the United Kingdom, will explore and discuss this topic.

In another development, President Sirleaf has recently joined the Board of Directors for the Mastercard Foundation.

The Foundation works with young people in Africa and Indigenous communities in Canada to access dignified and fulfilling work.

It is one of the largest, private foundations in the world and has had a significant impact through its work to promote financial inclusion and create a more equitable world.

In announcing the appointment, Board Chair Zein M. Abdalla said: “President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf is a global leader for women’s empowerment. The depth of her knowledge on the continent and experience on the world stage will be invaluable as we work to enable 30 million young women and men in Africa to access dignified and fulfilling work by 2030.”

Madam Sirleaf highlighted the alignment between the Mastercard Foundation’s mission and her work through the EJS Center and other activities to advance equity and inclusion across Africa: “The Mastercard Foundation is committed to equity and inclusivity, and their approach to working with others involves deep listening, collaboration, and respect. These are values that I commend and share. I look forward to working with the Foundation’s Board and senior management team to ensure we continue to drive sustainable and meaningful change on the continent.”

13 COMMENTS

  1. I hope these Africans will one day come to know this irredeemable hoodlum and old wretched witchcraft who ruined and denuded Liberia of its pride and place of civility: She sponsored a war that killed nearly a quarter million of Liberians. Then out of sheer ignorance and a deluge of illiteracy and war induced trauma, Liberians elected her as they elected her co-conspirator Charles Taylor.

    Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf is not worth speaking to any decent group of humans. She is a rouge and a murderer. She and her sons stole million of dollars of the country money. By the time she left office, Forbes magazine estimated her worth to be 3 billion dollars.

    Before going in for the Liberian presidency, she was one of Liberia’s poorest educated elite fighting to get power to enrich herself. Unfortunately for a war-ravaged Liberia, she succeeded given the kind of society Liberia is.

    Her son Robert Sirleaf bribed unscrupulous state security officials to murder Harry Greaves, Jr for fear of the latter whistling about his alleged bankrupting of the national oil company in a tone of 100 million dollars.

    Again, no decent group of people will invite a criminal like Ellen Johnson to speak to them. She is singularly responsible for the decimation of Liberia.

    • Miatta S. Momoh, how dare you call our Nobel laureate and your Harvard graduate names!? The fact that you all are politicians, but she out-smarted all of you, used all of you for her own political goals, and then dumped you people, are good lessons for the political repentance of every single one of you from your ACDL/NPFL GANG.

      • Fatou you are so sodden with absolute neuroticism. Nobel Prize and Harvard graduate? Give me a break!

        She lobbied for the coveted Nobel prize when she heard Leymah Gbowee was slated for nomination. She spent about one million dollar of your country’s money to lobby with the Norwegian committee on Alfred Nobel Prize. Who doesn’t know that story, perhaps, except the likes of you.

        Harvard graduate, a discounted Harvard degree that was obtained back in the 60s? They told you that everyone who comes from Harvard is schooled in cultivated leadership? May be that notion is what carried some of you away. She worked for a corrupt United Nations Systems and deceived her simi-German skin pigment to lured most people into seen as a serene soul for transformation. It was a hype and a deception at the core of her very existence.

        A sound bachelor degree holder in Economics from UL is better than Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf. Do you know how many people wrote the book for her, This Child will Be great? She never read her own manuscript of the book. If she had written the book herself she would not have alluded to the fact that she was sleeping with her boyfriend when Tolbert’s assassins were doing their dirty job of killing him that night–April 12, 1980; she would also not have alluded to the fact that she had intimated relationships with Sergeant Doe as she was seen with him in the mansion around 4 AM for about six month following the coup. She prevailed on Doe to appoint her at the LBDI. You might want to read her book, or the book that is presumed to be written by her–THIS CHILD WILL BE GREAT.

        Because her mother was an English teacher and did spent time teaching her diction and elocution, her speaking skill is easy to fool most people for her intelligence. She is not as smart as you think. She is damn corrupt and wicked woman. But I leave you live with your ignorance since I can not inoculate you from your self-inflated incurable malaise.

        • Miatta Momoh, you make me laugh. With all YOUR HYSTERICAL OBSESSION HERE with the achievements of a national, international, and world figure who served as Deputy Secretary General for the world safety -net The United Nations, and then former President of your country, IT IS CLEAR that with all this your exhibition of anger, frustration, envy, jealousy, guilt, rage, etc. against a single person, IT IS YOU MIATTA MOMOH THE ONE suffering from chronic neuroticism. And you know it as well as everyone reading your copious diatribe against a world figure.

    • Miatta S. Momoh, are you saying that NOCAL Dr. Randolph McClain, Dr. H. Bomah Fahnbulleh Jr. Joseph Boakai, Dr. Togba Nah Tipoteh, Dew Mayson, Dusty Wolokolie, Conmanny Wisseh, James Fromoyan, Toga Macintosh Garyeweh, Harry A. Greaves Jr.FrontPageAfrica, Kenneth Best, and relatively the entire so called Liberian intelligentsia campaigned for and voted for Ellen “out of sheer ignorance and a deluge of illiteracy and war induced trauma”??

      If you say, you people did not vote Taylor to power (just as in the case of Dr. Weah), but was rather voted to power by the masses, even a dead man will be willing to rise and say” you are right! But never in the case of Ellen, where the world saw philosophers, economists, lawyers, educators, wall Street koubahs and the rest of the PhDs campaigning from door to door for Ellen!

      And after that stealing of the peopleś votes, you all were rewarded with very lucrative positions. Sawyer was given his Governance Commission. Randolph McClain was offered NOCAL. Richard Tolbert was dashed with the Investment Commission. Tipoteh became economic adviser. Lands Mines and Energy was thrown to Eugene Shannon. Tiawen Gongloe and Joseph Korto were heavily awarded with chief prosecutor and education minister respectively.

      Harry Greaves was given the big elephant – LPRC. Boima Fahnbulleh Jr. was given a desk next to Ellen, but later Ellen threw a spell upon him and placed him in a bottle right on her desk. I am not saying “they say.” I went to visit Ellen at her office and saw Boima in that bottle whining “chewn chewn chewn” every now and then. And then Ellen would say:”shut-up”! I have a visitor.

      The Harry Greaves´Jr and Boima Fahnbulleh Jr cases are typical of how Ellen machiavellianized all of you and gave you people the “back kick” upon leaving office.

  2. The presence of a former UN executive and Liberia’s President Mr. Sirleaf is needed at this Africa Forum, because the UN warned G20 countries last night to step up, or “COVID-19 will devastate poorest nations if the West does not act”. According to the projection, as the pandemic recedes in Europe and America, the impacts on the global recession are already being forgotten. And much of the estimated poverty is going to ironically come from social distancing.

    Put another way, that essential preventive guideline meant to reduce deaths would devastate local economies. In this quagmire, only a nation of irresponsible people can be nonchalant about getting someone suitable in that milieu at the table. Many of us have gone hoarse shouting that the economies of MRU countries pose the greatest threat to stability in the basin. Let’s leave the lady to go out there and get a handle on what’s going on; we haven’t heard the last of this pandemic: Lord have mercy!

  3. Hi Mr. Sylvester Gbayahforh Moses,

    Don’t you think that Africa’s first female President, Mrs. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf should address some of the money-item issues listed below before accepting invitations from International Institutions to address global issues? Can any country address money-item problems without adequate cash?

    The writer of the article called (To Fight Corruption, Former President Sirleaf… Must be Investigated” carried by this paper and the Perspective asked these questions: “1) Why did the former President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf administration borrow US $139M between September 2016 through June 2017 since it printed new banknotes of L$18.1B within 2016 and 2017? The International Monetary Fund (IMF) stated on page # 2 of the its December 2017 Report that Liberia’s debt increased from US $597M in June of 2016 to US $736M in September 2017.

    2) What is/was the Ebola-excess money-arrangement, according to page # 5 of the IMF Report, between former President Sirleaf’s administration and the IMF , which allowed the IMF to withdraw money from Liberia’s excess cash held at the CBL?

    3) Did former President Sirleaf’s administration withdraw money from bank accounts owned by Liberian state-owned entities (Liberian Electricity Corporation, Liberia National Social Security Corporation, Liberia Petroleum Refining Company, National Port Authority, etc.? An audit would answer this question.

    4) Why did former President Sirleaf inform Liberians in 2018 that the country held US $154M rainy-day-savings as at December 31, 2017, when the country was actually owing US $260M as at December 2016 to the Central Bank of Liberia (CBL)?

    5) Also, the CBL stated on page XV of its 2009 Report that out of the US $296M International Foreign Excess Reserves, the real cash was US $42M, while US $254M represented the credit arrangement called “Special Drawing Rights.” This Special Drawing Rights information from 2009 Annual Report of the Central Bank of Liberia provides evidence that former President Sirleaf misinformed Liberians that the country had US $154M real cash at December 31, 2017.

    6) What happened to the (US $30M or US $60M) donated by late former Libyan leader Colonel Muammar Ghadaffi for the rice project in Lofa County? The failure of the project was attributed to former Vice President Boakai. Only an audit would lay this matter to rest.

    7) Did former President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf prevent Mr. Robert Sirleaf, her son from accounting for the US $10M in corporate social responsibility fund provided by Chevron? President Sirleaf, at an official gathering, stated that she authorized Chevron to give government’s US $10M to Mr. Robert Sirleaf because he (Robert Sirleaf) would prudently spend the money on behalf of the people of Liberia.

    8) Did former President Sirleaf authorize Mr. Robert Sirleaf, her son, to spend US $138M out of US $140M in the 2012/2013 National Budget as per the schedule below? This amount was a significant percentage of the National Budget in 2012/2013.”

  4. Hi, Mr J Yanqui Zara,

    With no intention of downplaying those concerns, EJS has been out of office for three years, which suggests that those allegations Are Not a national priority compared to reconciliation, education, workforce development, empowering small businesses, physical infrastructural developments, and so on the administration is pursuing. They Are Not because, never mind how much we pretend, Liberia is a country which has been divided since her founding and needs fence mending and healing more than any satisfaction to disgrace the first elected President since Tubman who retired from office. Moreover, addressing an Africa Forum at which the effectiveness of our continent’s collective response to COVID-19 will be on the agenda has stability significance. Let’s leave this old lady alone to help Liberia how she knows best: Out there.

  5. My bad, Mr. J. Yanqui Zaza, I now remember that EJS was the first President since Barclay (1943) who retired from office – wow, what a record!

    • Is that now the recounting legacy of Ellen, Sylvester? Did she not retire and put in place an ersatz to protect her interest? Thinking is hard my dear and I think you are tired thinking. You can not give an intellectual response to Zaza.

      • If thinking were to be hard, NEHNSEE would have never been used, or in fact, many many many Vai parents would not take into account the side effects, and desist from giving same to their children!!!

        In other words, thinking only becomes hard when THE TRUTH is not independent of emotions, will, and even conscience, or wishful thinking, prejudice, stereotype, etc.etc.

        But when THE TRUTH remains the property of REALITY, thinking is soft and easy!!! For example: the fact that despite the intended ecclesiastical and political machinations and religious dogmatic manipulations of THE PAPACY, Galileo Galilei proved to the world that the Ptolemaic or geocentric theory which held that the Earth was at the center of the universe, was seriously flawed!

        For as it is written: “TRUTH KNOWS NO BARRIER”!!! And as “fired” by Auguste Compte:”Thinking is soft and easy when the intellect resists been the slave of the passions.”

        Exempli gratia: The fact as fired by Sylvester Moses that “EJS was the first President since Barclay (1943) who retired from office – wow, what a record!

        Or still further, no matter how the multitudes or political neophytes may want to hypocritically associate the Florentine born philosopher of the Italian Renaissance Niccolo Machiavelli with the devil, the truth remains that the political conviction of Niccolo Machiavelli remains the lifeblood of both international politics, and domestic politics!And even life in toto; on a planet of diversity and scarcity!!!

        Hence, no book on PHILOSOPHY can be taken seriously, or even just written, without mention of Niccolo!!! For “TRUTH KNOWS NO BARRIER, and as Auguste Compte propounds: “Thinking is soft and easy when the intellect resists been the slave of the passions.

        In short, neither ELLEN THE GREAT vehement refusal to use her incumbent power to reverse the democratic choice of the majority, nor the frustration of those (eg. “Miatta Momoh”, Joseph Boakai, etc. etc) rejected by THE PEOPLE at the polls, can ever alter the indelible factuality of that reality and truism, that ELLEN THE GREAT “was the first President since Barclay (1943) who retired from office” as “fired” by national security intelligence analyst – Sylvester Gbayahforh Moses!!! For as it is written: “TRUTH KNOWS NO BARRIER!!!

  6. Dear Liberians,

    May we document past events in our history books for our children to learn and forge ahead optimistically to a better future?
    No doubts, all our past and present rulers have erred in one way or the other but I think it’s high time we came together to begin sustainable nation building projects.

    Let’s learn to avoid anger and violence, vote objectively in 2023 to build a nation for ourselves and children.
    Long live Liberia!

  7. Miatta S. Momoh

    “Thinking“ is what I do as a national security intelligence analyst. Anyway, if by “intellectual response” you meant debunking J. Yanqui Zaza’s listed allegations, that, apparently, couldn’t have been my purpose. We aren’t strangers, and I am sure it was obvious to him.

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