FJN Concludes Michael Kpakala Francis Lecture Series

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The Faith and Justice Network brought together several churches and clergymen from different denominations to discourse issues relating to the role of the church in maintaining a society of peace and justice to exemplify the late Archbishop Michael K. Francis.

A faith-based organization known as the Faith and Justice Network (FJN) has completed the third edition of its “Intellectual discourse on Social Justice and Peace” in honor of the late Catholic Archbishop Michael Kpakala Francis.

FJN is an apolitical, nonprofit and Christian Institution based in Monrovia, Liberia. It has Christian goals and objectives and operates according to Christian Ethics and Moral Principles.

The program, held on February 27, 2020, in Brewerville City, Montserrado County, brought together several churches and clergymen from different denominations to discourse issues relating to the role of the church in maintaining a society of peace and justice to exemplify the late Francis.

Pastor Gemane Getteh of the Seventh Day Adventist (SDA) Church, who served as keynote speaker, called on churches to champion the cause of justice as it was done by the former Catholic Archbishop.

According to Pastor Getteh, during the days of former Archbishop Michael Francis, the church stood for true justice but, unlike in this dispensation, the church is silent on issues of concern that should reflect true governance considering the principles Liberia was built on.

He used the medium to commend the Faith and Justice Network for creating the platform to allow churches to come together and discuss issues that can bring about sustainable peace and justice in the society.

Pastor Getteh also stressed the need for Liberians to have a peaceful and democratic society, that the church must work with the government but in a distinct manner void of corruption.

He cautioned the church to be part of governing the state but should be an example of what he termed as the light of the world.

For her part, the former Chief Justice of Liberia, Cllr. Gloria Musu Scott, called on the church of Liberia to engage in activities that will bring value to the Christian community and society at large; adding that no amount of pressure from the government should lead to compromising the role of the church.

According to Cllr. Scott, one thing that helped to reduce the weight of the church is some church leaders are no longer preaching the true message of Jesus, instead they are after personal gain, something the former Chief Justice said if the church cannot desist, the society will go nowhere.

President of the National Christian Council of Liberia, Bishop Rudolph Marsh Sr., lamented the division of the church in the country.

Bishop Marsh said Liberia is a nation that was built on a true Christian foundation and is supposed to be governed in the fear of God but instead, there are vices that are polluting the society through leaders who do not fear God.

He added that it’s not possible to divorce the governance of the state from the church.

Bishop Marsh furthered that he is going to work with the Faith and Justice Network in bringing churches together to define the role of the church in governing the state, with respect to peace and justice; noting that one way to process is for citizens to put their differences aside despite religious denominations.

Meanwhile, Dr. Tolbert Jallah, Executive Director of the FJN, is working in the Manor River Union basin to promote peace and justice in the sustainability of democratic governance.

Dr. Jallah said over the years the work of the FNJ, has been working to bringing churches of different denominations together and to remind them of the role played by the late Michael Kpakala Francis, who led the church to champion the cause of the peace and justice in the sustenance of a democratic and a caring society. He used the occasion to call on the church leaders to promote the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for the sustainability of global peace and justice and other instruments viable for a democratic society.

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