First West Point Ebola Body Removed Wednesday

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The body of an Ebola victim in West Point, Monrovia’s largest slum, was yesterday removed after two nights in the open.

The West Point Commissioner, Madam Haja Flowers, told the Daily Observer, the individual, a male, dropped dead on Monday and repeated calls were made for its removal, but response was delayed.  However, on Wednesday morning government people came and picked up the body for transport to the crematorium.

The head of a leading church  in West Point revealed to the Daily Observer last night that the victim whose body was removed was a mentally unstable man who had resided at the football field in West Point.

The church leader told this newspaper that there are other suspected Ebola cases near New Road in West Point, and that health authorities were en route to the township last night to conduct tests on them.  If these tests proved   positive, the affected persons will be taken away and quarantined. 

This church leader further informed the Daily Observer that he had learned that several persons from Guinea afflicted with the virus had entered West Point and had since died and were secretly buried.  There are other affected persons from Guinea who are feared to have fled the places where they were living in West Point, and are now circulating in the wider community.  This is highly dangerous, this church leader said.

Observers said West Point inhabitants were very worried about the Ebola body tarrying for a long period in the township, fearing that its exposure to the general population might have provoked a further spread of the deadly Ebola virus. 

Such a situation, said one   observer, could spread to the Water Side and would endanger the entire Monrovia community, since tens of thousands of people from West Point circulate in the city on a daily basis and are employed in many workplaces around the city, including government institutions.

This observer stressed the need for the health authorities to develop a strategy to contain the virus in that township of over 100,000 people, the majority of them children. 

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