Ex-Lawmaker Fahnbulleh Risks Imprisonment

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Mr. Fahnbulleh faces imprisonment for a contempt charge.

The failure of former Montserrado County District#4 lawmaker Henry Fahnbulleh to appear before Civil Law Court ‘A’ at the Temple of Justice may likely land him at the Monrovia Central Prison (MCP).

Fahnbulleh, now a senior staff at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, was on Thursday, August 29, 2019 expected to attend his ‘Damages for Wrong’ lawsuit, which one Loysius Garr brought against him seeking damages in the amount of US$150,670. But Fahnbulleh did not show up at the trial.

Garr is seeking monetary award of US$670 as special damages, and US$150,000 for his discomfort and mental anguish suffered as the direct result of Fahnbulleh’s driver’s wrongful conduct.

Fahnbulleh’s absence was enough to compel Judge Yamie Gbeisay Quiqui to hold him in contempt so that the court would subsequently arrest and jail him.

The lawsuit that brought Fahnbulleh under the jurisdiction of the court alleges that on February 7, 2015 officers of the Liberia National Police (LNP) launched an investigation into an accident that occurred on SKD Boulevard near the Total Gas Station involving Fahnbulleh’s pick-up truck and Mr. Garr.

One Mohammed Kamara was the driver of Fahnbulleh’s pickup, but the lawmaker was not in the car when the accident happened.

When he was interrogated, Kamara admitted to being in the wrong. Thereafter, Garr was rushed to the John F. Kennedy (JFK) Medical Center from where, the court’s record claimed, he spent four days undergoing medical treatment.

While at the JFK, doctors diagnosed Garr of sustaining fractures in the  hip (Pelvic) and that as a result he also suffered from partial blurred vision in both eyes that are currently affecting him.

Thereafter, the hospital discharged Garr and advised him to seek further treatment, after which his family took him to the Greater Refuge Clinic in Paynesville, for another examination and possible treatment by a bone doctor. By then, according to the record, he was not taking anymore treatment at the Greater Refugee Clinic because of ‘financial constraints.’

After the accident, the document claimed that Fahnbulleh visited the JFK where he saw Garr in excruciating pains. He then paid the initial medical bills, but since that time, according to the court, Fahnbulleh did not see Garr until he was discharged.

Garr’s situation was so severe that his family took him to a Guinean herbalist in Conakry, where he was ‘treated’ for several months without any improvement until his family decided to bring him back to Liberia.

In Guinea, Garr was also advised to seek further treatment, preferably in Ghana. Garr has made several attempts to meet with Fahnbulleh, but his effort has proven futile, thereby causing him to seek the court’s intervention so as to compel Fahnbulleh to award him US$670 as special damages and US$150,000 for the discomfort and mental anguish he suffered as a direct result of the ‘wrongful conduct’ of Fahnbulleh’s driver.

1 COMMENT

  1. What a travesty of justice? I am no fan of Fahnbulleh’s, but please, this accident or law suit cannot be pinned on the man by any stretch. And a judge is compelling the man to appear in court to answer to what, an offense committed by someone else? What kind of bad luck Liberia see so? Is there any arm or organ of the judiciary responsible for monitoring the misrepresentation or misapplication of the law in this stupid manner? Same way the police is noted for apprehending and incarcerating family members of persons of interest nowadays, or wanted persons on the run from the law. What do families or friends of anyone afoul of the law have to do with that individual’s purported crime? Is crime transferrable in Liberia now? Whereas the very judges are setting offenders including rapists free, on frivolous medical necessity pretexts. Liberians must surely be in a hellish bind with a messed up education system; messed up healthcare system; messed up roads; messed up legal or law enforcement; messed up economy and the list goes on. What a bind?

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