Dr. Tipoteh Emphasizes Human Resource Development

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Economist and politician Dr. Togba-Nah Tipoteh has called for investment in the human capital of the country.

In a statement at a symposium marking his 75th birthday held in the auditorium of the University of Liberia, Dr. Tipoteh said among resources available to mankind, human resource is the most important.

He emphasized that Liberians are the ones to value themselves and not any one country or individual.

Dr. Tipoteh said instead of Liberians valuing themselves, they send thousands of United States dollars to other countries to add value to others, instead of their own country.

He added that solving problems without violence can be successful in a country if its people are provided with better education and opportunities and become part of their own economy.

The symposium was attended by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, former Chief Justice Henry Reed Cooper, former Grand Kru County Senator Cletus Wortorson, veteran Liberian educator, Mary Brownell, and members of the Progressive Movement including Dr. Amos Sawyer, Dew Mayson, Senator Conmany Wesseh and others.

President Sirleaf described Dr. Tipoteh as a “Consistent” person in Liberia because since she became friends with him and others in the 1950s, he has always demonstrated honesty and consistency in his dealings.

Mother Mary Brownell, who is a former teacher of Dr. Tipoteh’s, praised him for his advocacy role for justice in Liberia.

She recalled that during Liberia’s civil crisis, Dr. Tipoteh helped to mobilize Liberians to register their disdain for war in order to get the warlords to stop the war.

Freedom of speech and the press enjoyed today in Liberia came through the instrumentality of Dr. Tipoteh and the “Progressives,” Mother Brownell said.

A founding member of the Liberia Labor Congress, Elitha Manning said she admired Dr. Tipoteh because he is a man of principle.

She said Dr. Tipoteh has demonstrated his simplicity in being accessible to all despite his high level of education.

In addition to the symposium, the guests were entertained with cultural performances.

Members of the Progressive Movement were also seen wearing the rubber sandals otherwise referred to as “Tipoteh.”

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