Boakai Promises 50K Jobs in First 150 Days

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Vice President Boakai: “Road connectivity is key in Liberia because the lack thereof has made it difficult to implement development programs in the country.”

Vice President Joseph Nyuma Boakai has promised to create 50,000 jobs in 150 days to help ease the high unemployment rate that affects especially young people when he emerges victorious in the pending presidential elections.

The ruling Unity Party and the country’s largest opposition, Coalition for Democratic Change (CDC), are poised to compete in the upcoming runoff, which has been scheduled for December 26th.

The UP Standard bearer, who boasts of being the most competent and qualified to reconcile and unite Liberians and lead the country, said bringing relief to many of the masses through employment opportunities is the best way to start his administration.

Addressing a local talk-show in Monrovia on Monday morning, VP Boakai said “We will create 50,000 jobs in our first 150 days in office. The essence of leadership is to help our people and this is why we are in this race. We have the vision to help this country and help our people—we will do just that upon winning.”

He indicated that the means and avenues for the creation of these jobs are already in place, but that it takes the rightful leader to venture into such a noteworthy task.

Though VP Boakai had as his flagship project road connectivity across the country during his tenure, he said he also has a very elaborate short-term plan that is intended to see efforts in all major sectors of the country. He, however, maintained road connectivity as the major element that will help to open up the country.

At a presidential debate in Paynesville City a few months ago, he said road connectivity is key in Liberia because the lack thereof has made it difficult to implement development programs in the country.

Boakai also disclosed that agriculture, women’s empowerment, education, and economic development will be among his key priorities, upon his election.

“Inter-connectivity of the nation has a positive trickle-down effect on education, health, agriculture and other vital sectors of the economy,” he noted.

Liberia’s problem has been centralizing everything in Monrovia, which has contributed to the underdeveloped state of other parts of the country and, according to VP Boakai, “Monrovia is not Liberia; and therefore, we need to open up the country and reach the farmers and other people.”

“With feeder roads, farmers will have access to the markets for their produce and they will be in the position to generate money from their activities and ventures,” he said.

When citizens are not in the position to pay their taxes, they feel disenfranchised, he noted, adding: “If people are earning from their produce, they will pay taxes.”

VP Boakai said his vision to build roads across the country will help provide jobs and create wealth.

The VP’s promise of massive employment could be seen by pundits as a rather tall order, though not impossible.  Yet a similar promise by his predecessor, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, for the provision of 20,000 jobs every year, could not be realized due to internal and external shocks that made things difficult.

Many Liberians see VP Boakai as an honorable man, especially looking at his track record from the public sector. Many describe him as honest; a man with integrity who is without any stigma of corruption.

However, the UP government has and continues to receive a barrage of criticisms for doing little to fight corruption. But the UP standard bearer noted that he will do all in his capacity to fight the menace, which is the primary cause of not just the backwardness of the country, but the impoverished state of its people.

He said corruption is a poison that makes people in authority to want to use government to provide for them and their unborn generations—noting that punishment against corrupt officials will be no lip service.

“You want to be corrupt, go elsewhere; it won’t happen under my watch,” he warned.

Guilty By Association
Asked about his relationship with his boss, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the VP said that he believes there is no animosity or bad blood between them, but said his only sin is that he is “guilty by association.”

The two were considered trusted friends in the past as they have known each other for a very long time—dating back to their days in high school at the College of West Africa, where Boakai, a junior to Ellen both in age and class, was a humble janitor.

Their relationship transcended beyond the school campus to the national scene when Madam Sirleaf selected VP Boakai as her running mate in 2005.

But the relationship seemed to have strained since Boakai expressed his ambition to succeed his good friend and boss, Madam Sirleaf.

VP Boakai disclosed on the talk-show: “I am guilty by association—that is the only crime I have committed against my long-time friend Ellen Johnson Sirleaf. My association with Cllr. Sherman and Wilmot Paye is the only crime I have committed.”

8 COMMENTS

  1. Did Joe Boakai say how he was going to CREATE the 50,000 youth jobs in his 150 days as President? How will he do it? By hiring 25,000 youths to dig holes and another 25,000 to fill them back in??

  2. I agree with VP Boakai as it relates to the creation of jobs for Liberians. I strongly believe that VP Boakai is being advised on a professional level. Job creation should be made a top priority irrespective of the slow economic growth that Liberia currently experiences.

    In the past, the government had relied on foreign investors to create jobs. To an extent, jobs were created by foreign entities, but some jobs had required skills that many Liberians did not have. But if Boakai keeps his word, I am sure he will do his country men and women an unforgettable good.

  3. I know exactly the line Boakai, is running but CDC, could well take him off balance provided they have an understanding of where the VP’s massage is heading to. Boakai, understands i democracy makes sure that people will have the right to choice their rulers. ii Whenever possible , citizen should participate in the decision-making process. iii This is known as transparency. iiii Therefore, the most basic outcome of democracy is that it produces a government that is accountable to citizens and is responsive to the needs and expectations of the citizen. I am analyzing from his interviewed. If I were to be a CDCIAN, my question to him could be to tell the Liberian people what are some of the major merits and demerits of democracy for the government he served all these years? Telling the people he is guilty by association is not going to be a reason for him to continue in government, especially as president for them. He is an experience man, and considered himself the right person to reconcile and provide job. We know there is always going to be the difference a sectional and public interest groups. So it is up to the old man, Boakai, for whatever reason or reasons he felt-off with his boss, the President, to be his problem. Oh man! The papay is well schooled in social science, let him stop playing catch up game with people around here.. Hahaha..

    • You are another dull George Weah. It’s simple economic theory that embarking on massive reconstruction projects like road construction and maintenance, and opening up large agro-based activities, is bound to generate jobs especially for the youth, leading to more revenue to GoL, and at the same time better money flow within the economy. Your George Weah does not have a clue as to where to even start, let alone muster the courage to take to the radio, as educated, experienced and patriotic JNB is always very willing and comfortable to do.

  4. Your Excellency Joseph N. Boakai, thank you for seen and making it part of your priority
    project- the good or paved roads network throughout the length and breath of Liberia.
    This has never happen since 1822. Because it never happened since 1822, that is why
    Liberia is where it is today. If each president would had open at least 2 or 3 paved roads
    network, by now the country would have boast of intra development.

    WHAT CAN A PAVED ROADS NETWORK CAN DO FOR A COUNTRY?
    I want to recall a conversation between Presidents Samuel Kanyon Doe and Badamasi
    Banbagida of the Federal republic of Nigeria.

    President Doe: Calling President Banbagida said, Senior brother I want to ask you a
    very serious question.
    Banbagida: Go ahead!
    Doe : Is it a crime for an African country that is rich and able to help another
    sister African country to develop?
    Banbagida: Not at all! But, I don’t know what you are talking about!
    Doe : Look, Senior brother, it costs my country US$500,000.00 just for one
    Master degree from the United States. This is the kind of money I need
    to develop my country. You have all those Phds people in Nigeria. Can you help for some
    of them to come here (in Liberia) to establish a Master degree program? please?
    Banbagida: Well, I understand now what you are talking about. Send some your
    Professors from the University to meet with their colleagues here.
    Doe : Thank you so much Senior brother. I will do.

    Banbagida: What other questions or concerns do you have on your mind?
    Doe : Senior brother, I really want to develop my country. I need your help
    for me to do.
    Banbagida: Well, Junior brother, it is not you who will physically develop Liberia. It
    is the Liberian people who will develop the country, although you have
    a part, one serious part to play and the people will do the rest. Your part or role you
    will play is to open up the entire country with paved roads network. A person or group
    of people want to build their home here or there will buy their bundle of zincs, put them
    in the pick-ups and carry those building materials and build their home or whatever
    development they want in their respective areas. So you see, that is the incentive you
    have to give to the Liberian people, but it is not yourself personally to build. So, you
    Junior brother, it is the Liberian people who will build their country, not you yourself personally.

    WHAT CAME OUT OF THIS CONVERSATION OR EXCHANGES BETWEEN DOE AND BANBAGIDA?
    (1) The establishment of Ibrahim Banbagida International Relations Master’s degree at the
    University of Liberia.
    (2) The Ganta – Harper Highway through Grand Gedeh County to Harper City, Maryland.

  5. P. Allison Tarlue, Sr. December 19, 2017 at 8:05 pm

    Your Excellency Joseph N. Boakai, thank you for seen and making it part of your priority
    project- the good or paved roads network throughout the length and breath of Liberia.
    This has never happened since 1822. Because it never happened since 1822, that is why
    Liberia is where it is today. If each president would had opened, at least, 2 or 3 paved roads
    network, by now the country would have boast of intra development.

    WHAT CAN A PAVED ROADS NETWORK DO FOR A COUNTRY?
    I want to recall a conversation between Presidents Samuel Kanyon Doe and Badamasi
    Banbagida of the Federal republic of Nigeria.

    President Doe: Calling President Banbagida said, Senior brother, I want to ask you a
    very serious question.
    Banbagida: Go ahead!
    Doe : Is it a crime for an African country that is rich and able to help another
    sister African country to develop?
    Banbagida: Not at all! But, I don’t know what you are talking about!
    Doe : Look, Senior brother, it costs my country US$500,000.00 just for one
    Master’s degree from the United States. This is the kind of money I need
    to develop my country. You have all those Phds people in Nigeria. Can you help for some
    of them to come here (in Liberia) to establish a Master’s degree program? please?
    Banbagida: Well, I understand now what you are talking about. Send some your
    Professors from the University of Liberia to meet with their colleagues here.
    Doe : Thank you so much Senior brother. I will do.

    Banbagida: What other questions or concerns do you have on your mind?
    Doe : Senior brother, I really want to develop my country. I need your help
    for me to do so.
    Banbagida: Well, Junior brother, it is not you who will physically develop Liberia. It
    is the Liberian people who will develop the country, although you have
    a part, one serious part to play and the people will do the rest. Your part or role you
    will play is to open up the entire country with paved roads network. A person or group
    of people want to build their home(s) here or there will buy their bundle of zincs, put them
    in the pick-ups and carry those building materials and build their home(s) or whatever
    development they want in their respective areas. So you see, that is the incentive you
    have to give to the Liberian people, but it is not yourself personally to build. So, you
    Junior brother, it is the Liberian people who will build their country, not you yourself personally.

    WHAT CAME OUT OF THIS CONVERSATION OR EXCHANGES BETWEEN DOE AND BANBAGIDA?
    (1) The establishment of Ibrahim Banbagida International Relations Master’s degree at the
    University of Liberia.

    (2) The Ganta – Harper Highway through Grand Gedeh County to Harper City, Maryland.

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