2 Lawmakers Want Bong-Cuttington Documents Reviewed

-Frowned on hike in tuition fees

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Rep. George Mulbah

Representatives George Mulbah and Lester Paye, both of Bong County, have called for a review of the documents that permitted the Cuttington University (CU) to operate in the county.

The two lawmakers told local journalists on Saturday, March 18, in Gbarnga that their decision to request for the documents stems from the unprecedented hike in tuition by the school’s administration.

With Liberia being an impoverished country where parents find it extremely difficult, if not impossible, to meet their children’s basic needs, including education, the lawmakers said the increase in school fees at CU is a clear indication that they want to deprive the disadvantaged from acquiring higher education.

“We believe that CU was purposely established in Bong County to complement government’s efforts to educate its citizens, and not to increase tuition at the detriment of poverty-stricken parents,” the two lawmakers said.

They also told journalists that they will write a formal communication to the House of Representatives to invite the CU administration to appear before plenary to explain why it hiked school fees although the national government provides a subsidy to the institution.

“In the 2016/2017 fiscal year, CU received more than US$1 million as subsidy, but school fees are yet high,” they said.

CU was moved to Suakoko, Bong County in 1948 from Harper, Maryland County, on 1,500 acres of land provided by the people of Bong County.

“We are of the strong opinion that the CU administration may not have paid money for those huge acres of land. There is a pressing need for CU and us to go back to the drawing board and review the documents,” the two lawmakers declared.

On March 2, 2016, the CU administration informed students and other stakeholders of its revised payment plan policy that requires self-sponsored students to deposit 75 percent of tuition and 100 percent of all other fees, including dormitory, laboratory, meals, as well as semester required fees, in cash at registration, and to the make payment of the remaining 25 percent at mid-term.

The revised payment plan explained that the registration fee, which was previously US$155 during Dr. Henrique Flomo Tokpa’s administration, that was stepped-up by 25 percent under Dr. Evelyn Kandakai to US$194 (now US$232.50), is expected to climb a further 25 percent every semester to 100 percent.

The revised payment plan says, “considering the continuous downward trend in the Government of Liberia’s financial support (subsidy) to CU and the undue delay in payment of tuition by self-sponsored students and scholarship donors resulting into accumulation of huge receivables at the end of every semester; for this, CU’s executive council has resolved to revise the tuition payment plan for all students including those at the graduate school.”

Although the revised tuition payment policy did not mention increment in school fees each semester, it is, however, increased every semester by 25 percent until it reaches 100 percent.

The CU administration has persistently maintained that until the government can live up to the agreed 80 percent support it previously signed with CU, the school will not lower its fees.

Because of the unprecedented hike in tuition, hundreds of students including graduating students may not attend this semester as registration closed on Saturday, March 18, 2017.

Meanwhile, the CU administration headed by its president, Dr. Herman B. Browne, is yet to comment on the proposal.

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5 COMMENTS

  1. The decision by two Bong County law makers to ask Cuttington University to bring documents for review to show who permitted the college to operate in the county because registration fees went up does not make any common sense because the two lawmakers probably never went to college and don’t know how college operates. Cuttington University like many universities in Liberia is a private college and Liberians have the right to attend or not to attend. The college is a boarding school that have to pay professors, feed the students and maintain the operation of the college. The registration and utilities fees compare to colleges around the World is about the least expensive. If you two law makers are concern about high registration fees at the college, why don’t you donate part of your salaries to the students? I think you should worry about your re-election bid and not who permitted the college to operate in Bong County

  2. What daftness of the lawmakers? Bong County Community College, which has been embroiled in corruption scandal for more than a year, depriving the children of Bong of a good education, should be their focus; fixing this problem so the young people can return to school. Cuttington University College is a private institution and it is none of their business!

  3. Bold re-election move by the two lawmakers! Let them help pay the Bong County students’ registration fees first, then we will know indeed they mean business. These are the same people who demand bribes (in the name of lobbying fees) from these struggling institutions, before they can even make a single allotment in the budget for them. So that one million they talking about, Cuttington can’t receive all yah, my people?

  4. The questions/concerns should not be about where/why Cuttington U/C is located in Bong County. There are circumstances beyond the controls of any Institution of Higher Learning. If Economic environment is changing; for the worst, as it is the case inLiberia, C.U may have no choice, but to raise the necessary fees in order to make up the short falls. The two Law Makers should in fact be talking about ways to raise funds in support of Cuttington University. They should be rallying the alumini; as well as the Liberian Leadership and Public, to come to the “AID OF C.U.C”. Make no mistakes about it. A University Education is Precious And Priceless. Calling and Liberians: Cuttington University College, C.U.C needs our help; for a “MOST WORTHY CAUSE”… [email protected].

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