MESSENGERS OF PEACE

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Young people, especially those with opportunities to travel out of the shores of Liberia, are in despair because of the level of our social development when compared to that of other European and countries in the Western hemisphere. During a recent dialogue among peace messengers on our basic rights to social services, we noticed that most young people attributed rights to social services to include access to telecommunication, social media and the good things of life.

My generation is thrown off their basic social rights by the good things of other developed countries and fails to take cognizance of the limitations to social services like their limitation to good job, good water supply and sanitation, electricity, good access roads, basic housing for all, food security, quality health care and education. We have not even began to contemplate the issues associated to environmental pollution of our beaches, soil erosion, land degradation and climate change to mention a few

Last week, the IMF ranked Liberia 181 of 184 countries with the lowest and poorest economy of the world today. A Governance Commission report released recently at a Monrovia function said the lack of effective human capital has consistently served as a major impediment to the growth of the country’s economy and its overall output.

The report also noted that for Liberia to achieve its middle income target by 2030, it requires putting systems in place that are reflective of the actual needs of the various sectors. “The economies must be fused effectively to address the core problems at the center of Liberia’s under-development,” the report indicated.

At Messengers of peace, we noticed the logic that undergirds the report centers on corruption, the greed for money and quick fixes, power and control. The fixation of leaders, ministers and people with authority to implement change underpins our rights basic social services. Throughout history, African, particularly Liberians, we have endured various unbalanced political and social systems and if we do not address the core issue, our future to a balance social and political systems would be denied.

The Ebola epidemic has brutally exposed the weakness of our social system as well as the limitations of our basic social infrastructure and it would be in our best interest to benefit from the lessons learned. We need to educate our children through the stories and information we provide them with.

We are living in a period of capitalism and besides preserving our cultural values and ideology, we should not ask when or where the next meal would be available. We should not ask whether our children would have access to basic education or health care. Given the resources of this country, we should not depend on any nation for support in building our social system or in ensuring the rights of our citizens to basic social services are protected. It is the duty of our Government to provide these services and it’s our prerogative to demand them.

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Until next week, when we come to you with another article on: “Ebola Educates- The price of peacekeeping”, Peace First, Peace above all else, May Peace prevail on earth.

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