Ganta Unveils First Post-war Vocational and Technical School

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Nimba County’s first post-war vocational and technical institution has been unveiled to the public with full vocational education now taking place.

The “Sam Brown Technical Institute” began classes last month.

The proprietor of the institution, Sam Brown, told the Daily Observer that presently the school is offering three courses in agriculture, general mechanics and electricity.

“We will be teaching the students tree crop, rice and vegetable production and animal husbandry,” he said.

“We will also be offering light and heavy duty mechanics, with emphasis on agricultural equipment.”

He added that the institute will emphasize training the students on the repairing of agricultural tools and equipment, with emphasis on how to build their own models to enhance agricultural productivity.

When he visited the campus, our reporter saw the students already doing some practical aspects of their learning by disassembling a portable generator and naming the basic components.

The duration of the training is two years, including both practical and theoretical instruction, according to proprietor Brown.

Although there had been vocational training in Ganta during the post-war period, most had been sponsored by humanitarian organizations, lasting not more than a year.

“We are recruiting students who are above six grades, up to even college level, because our concern is for them to be able to read or write so that they will be able to grasp the technical aspects of the training,” Sam Brown added.

Nimba County has not had a vocational and technical institution since the collapse of the Baptist-owned Kwedin Mission in Lower Nimba and the LAMCO Vocational and Technical Institute some years back.

Proprietor Brown is calling on well-wishers for assistance.  The meagre fees collected are used to maintain the running of the school and take care of the staff, he said.

There are about seven high schools in Ganta and several elementary and junior high schools, but none offers vocation or technical education.  This has led to most school leavers without skills training or a trade, becoming motorcyclists.

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