Teenager Calls for Rigid School Supervision

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A Paynesville primary school student in is calling on the Ministry of Education to step up efforts to effectively supervise schools to ensure that Liberian children get the requisite primary education they deserve.

Student Melvina Monjolo of the Mount Carmel Open Bible Standard School in the 72nd community said primary education serves as foundation for upcoming children, and as such materials enshrined in the curriculum should be considered with sincerity.

Speaking as a valedictorian of the 6th grade class on Sunday July 6, Ms. Monjolo said the MOE should put in place a rigid supervision exercise of schools across the country to make sure that Liberian students have all of what it takes to become better students.

Liberia’s Education system is being polluted by malpractices ranging from sale of grades to sexual exploitation.

Reports have emerged on many occasions connecting teachers to intimidating students even at elementary and kindergarten level to pay certain amounts of money to pass.

This situation nowadays has caused students to disregard studying their lessons since financial payments and in some instances sex for grades can allow anyone to receive a promotion at the end of the school year.

Student Monjolo, 14, said: “As our country experiences severe economic instability, we are convinced that only students with solid academic foundation that have the mind set to pursue their education will be the ones to transform Liberia.”

“In this light, I want to urge the Ministry of Education to pay a more attention to supervision of our schools, especially, the elementary schools in order to give Liberian children the needed primary education.

“This means that MOE should provide essential instructional materials, better learning environment, and train teachers who will not harass, intimidate, and abuse us. If this is done, young girls and boys will be encouraged to pay attention to their lessons rather than loitering around,” she said.

Student Monjolo noted that she and her colleagues, whom she described as “academic candles”, recognized the honor of leaving one level to progress to the next because they spent their nights and parts of their days studying.

“It is extraordinary because the elementary division of any institution is cardinal since it is where a student gets the foundation,” she stressed.

“Many may have left these walls and considered the Mount Carmel Open Bible School as his or her alma mater, of which we are no exception. One thing we can assure our administration is that they must have confidence in our competence, trusting that we will do what they taught us and will ably represent this institution,” she emphasized.

“We do appreciate the sound and solid academic foundation that this institution offers. We are satisfied with the level of instruction thus far; but in our country as a whole, there is still much to get our system to be like other developing African countries,” student Melvina said.

Melvina intoned that she sees the honor as a challenge which obligates them to be more courageous and focused for greater achievements.

May I say to you congratulations, graduating class. Your name “Copy Head” suggests that what you have learned may go for life, that which a copybook cannot do.”

Melvina expressed gratitude to the administration, faculty and staff for the fatherly cordial relationship existing between teachers and students in the school.

“Your interest is to academically mold the minds of your students and give them moral teaching with biblical backing, she noted.”

The Principal of the school, Evangelist Mark Kangar, lauded the graduating classes for the steadfastness and discipline students exhibited, and called on other students to follow suit.

Principal Kangar described the students as children who are always determined to acquire education.

The graduation ceremony was the 15th exercise of the school. Over 20 students from the K-II and about ten from 6th grade graduated at the ceremony, which witnessed a huge presence of parents and relatives.

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