‘Start Small, Dream Big’

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“Many of us, as entrepreneurs, start off with small intentions to do big things. Although I love dreaming big and hear a lot about people thinking big, I find that there is also power in thinking small when we are getting started as entrepreneurs,” said Morris Zinnah, proprietor of Mazin Business Center (MBC) located in Kakata, Margibi County.

Supplying builders in Margibi County and beyond, the MBC sells building materials of all kinds, including cement, electrical appliances, plumbing equipment.

Mr. Zinnah resides in that county and competing with foreign business owners. He ensures that builders in that Margibi do not spend too much money on transportation to and from Monrovia.

In an interview with the Daily Observer recently in Kakata, the proprietor of MBC indicated that he is one person who believes in self-empowerment and it is time the Liberian government invests in its citizens to take over the economy.

Zinnah, a father of three and a graduate of the University of Liberia with BBA degree in Accounting, said, “To achieve a big breakthrough in life, I started with ‘waiter market’ and today I’m doing pretty well in the industry, despite challenges facing.”

He said after spending a couple of years in the ‘waiter market’ business and generating US$500, he started a rice depot, and with determination and focus the sky has been his limit.

With 18 years at MBC, a sole proprietorship, Mr. Zinnah noted that the Liberian business sector is finding difficulty to improve or survive in the competition, because when Liberians take loan from local banks, the interest rates are very high.

“It took me years to get to where I am today; it did not happen overnight. To build a successful business, you must start small and dream big. In the journey of entrepreneurship, tenacity of purpose is supreme,” he said.

He explained that for business to really improve in the country and gain more relevance among foreign businesses, the Liberian government should prioritize its citizens.

He noted that the business sector is finding it difficult to improve because the sector is being dominated by foreign businesses; and therefore, Liberians need material and financial empowerment.

He further suggested that if the government can empower Liberian businesses to compete with others, “I think we would change the face of the industry, and Liberians will begin to take their economy serious.

We need to speak it out, and to encourage our people to buy from Liberians.”

Mr. Zinnah also wants Liberian businesses to have the capacity and access to capital, and provide opportunities to Liberians interested in doing business.

He stressed the need for Liberians across the country to be productive in order to develop and gain skills for self-empowerment.

He urged Liberians to prioritize Liberian businesses by buying their products. “Liberians should love their own products and help to promote it because that will improve the local business sector,” he urged.

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