BRAC Donates Anti-Ebola Materials to Senow Academy

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Microfinance service provider BRAC Liberia, in partnership with Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA), yesterday demonstrated their commitment to Liberians when they donated several pieces of anti Ebola materials to the administration of the Senow Academy in the New Matadi community.

The materials are intended for students and the administration to take special preventive measures and avoid contracting the virus in the school.

BRAC, as a microfinance institution operating in Liberia, is also providing loans and healthcare opportunity to Liberians.

Mr. Mohammed Abdus Salam, BRAC Liberia country representative, who made the presentation on behalf of his institutional partner OSIWA, said the donation was intended to help buttress efforts that the government had made in combating the deadly Ebola virus disease.

According to him, although the Ebola cases in the country have considerably reduced in the country, people should not be complacent in the fight until health partners can pronounce the country Ebola free.

Mr. Salam then encouraged the administration of the school and the students to use the anti-Ebola materials they received for its intended purpose.

Earlier, BRAC program Manager for Health, Ezra Patrick Lugemwa, said his institution has targeted 350 schools from seven counties to benefit from the anti Ebola materials distribution exercise.

According to him, BRAC is also considering the inclusion of vulnerable people from the mother club members, village health teams, Trained Traditional Midwives (TTM), Microfinance borrowers, Poultry Livestock beneficiaries, Agriculture and Members from the newly established Empowerment Livelihood for Adolescents club as people who will eventually benefit from the exercise.

BRAC also used the occasion to discuss health and financial issues with residents in the New Matadi Community.

Senow Academy Principal Moses Z. Neeply, who received the items lauded BRAC and OSIWA for the contributions they made to the school.

 He however appealed to other humanitarian or non-governmental organizations for more supports to the schools.

 In another development, BRAC program manager for Empowerment and Livelihood for Adolescent (ELA),   Anzoyo Anita, says the organization aims to build the economic capacity of adolescent girls in rural and urban communities.

Madam Anita said once those girls are empowered financially, they will graduate from the Syndrome of dependency to doing positive things that will improve their livelihoods.

 She however cautioned Liberian girls to remain in school as a means to empower themselves for future opportunities.

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